Jump to content


Photo

First Time Move to Cozumel for a Complete Beginner


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 srice3

srice3

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 13 October 2010 - 11:48 AM

I plan on moving to cozumel in July to work as a dive instructor. I was interested in renting with just one bedroom, but I was wondering if there were fully furnished apartments or condos for rent? Also what would be the price of renting? Would I need to get a workers visa and how would I go about doing that? I live in Kansas and driving doesn't seem very realistic, how much would it cost to buy a scooter or used car with insurance? I did browse this section of the forum so I have a basic idea of how to move and what to do but I still feel clueless and would really appreciate extra tips.
  • 0

#2 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 13 October 2010 - 01:04 PM

You need to get a job FIRST and then the company that hires you can make all the arrangements and advise you. Do you have fluency in three or more languages and or what special skills and credentials do you possess to make hiring you justifiable when there are so many out of work or underworked qualified people here. July tends to be the start of the slowing down season which comes before the dead season, not a time to hire, but a time to fire or try to lay people off.

Plenty of places to rent, all price ranges from $300 to $3,000 a month.
  • 0

#3 CZMDM

CZMDM

    Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 811 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cozumel Island.

Posted 13 October 2010 - 03:28 PM

Working as a Dive Master or Dive Instructor In Cozumel

Throughout the year I get many inquiries from DM's and Instructors regarding working here on the island. I am happy to pass on the following information.That said the following is probably not what you want to hear.

For a foreigner to work at any given dive shop that shop must have 9 local employees for every non-local it employees.
For Americans to work here as DM's without first being an instructor is almost impossible. The same holds true with most other nationalities, except in the case where a particular person might speak a language that is not commonly found on the island.
The chances of Americans to work here in the diving industry are extremely small, unless you open your own dive-op.
The chances of an American opening a new dive-op are almost non-existent. There are some for sale and the documents are legally transferable.
You must be sponsored by an existing dive-op to obtain a working document which is called an FM3.
You must be fluent in Spanish and prove it by taking a written college level exam. You must have a grade of 85% or higher.
You must take a reef conservation course, in Spanish, to get your Marine Park certification.
If you try "cheating" or working on the side....the island is very small, dive-op's have to jump through hoops to operate, everybody knows everyone in the business, so you would be quickly found out and would be immediately deported.

With that said I sincerly wish you the very best of luck in your quest.
  • 0

Cozumel Diving


#4 roxie

roxie

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 59 posts

Posted 15 October 2010 - 11:31 PM

Too bad America is not as strict in it's policies regarding who we allow into our country..If everyone from Mexico had to take an English exam and pass with 85% - we would not have very many Mexicans here. lol
  • 0

#5 CZMDM

CZMDM

    Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 811 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cozumel Island.

Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:36 AM

Too bad America is not as strict in it's policies regarding who we allow into our country..If everyone from Mexico had to take an English exam and pass with 85% - we would not have very many Mexicans here. lol









Have you ever seen the test required for American Nationalization? I very much doubt that anyone on this board could pass it. Since I moved down here because I love the people of Mexico I personally am offended by your anti-Mexican sentiment. America is in chaos both economically and socially. The GOP has whipped a certain amount of people into a frenzy by pushing the belief that all of America's problems have been brought upon by illegal aliens and not the fact the both the war in Iraq and the corruption on Wall Street have just about brought the country to it's knees. And as far as illegal workers......well there are a couple hundred Americans here that are illegally renting condos and not paying tax nor do they have the documentation to do so. If my post sounds a little angry....well it is. I am tired of Mexicans being sh*t on for every problem the USA has. Even the drug wars because even the bad guys, the drug cartels, are only in operation to supply the needs of drug users in the USA, who by the way consume 87% of all illegal drugs. Sorry for the rant.
  • 2

Cozumel Diving


#6 sailsgal

sailsgal

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 360 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cozumel
  • Interests:diving, writing, water sports, sailing, travel.

Posted 16 October 2010 - 07:23 AM

My advice would be for you to come here on Vacation first...at least a month or more if possible...spend some time networking with the locals...Mexicans and expats on the island...
get a real feel for the island and then decide if you want to live here in the future.

Find a small apartment to rent, close to downtown and just hang out...you will learn a whole lot from this experience...You could VOLUNTEER with some organizations while here..
S.E.A program (Spanish English school) Humane Society (always need help) Red Cross, some of the schools look for English speaking people at times to do some conversational times with students who are learning English...just some ideas...do some research...what are your other skills?
  • 0
Susan aka Sailsgal
www.cozumeltours.com

#7 Guest_pecosgirl_*

Guest_pecosgirl_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 October 2010 - 10:52 AM

I live 3 miles from the border. There are many, many Mexicans here who don't want to take the exam and will never try. No skin off my nose. I can't fault them for wanting to be here illegally. But after they get here and find work and have continued to be here for a number of years, I as an American want them to get a Social Security number and pay taxes...just like I do.
  • 0

#8 diverhorn

diverhorn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bridge City, TX

Posted 17 October 2010 - 03:56 PM

I live 3 miles from the border. There are many, many Mexicans here who don't want to take the exam and will never try. No skin off my nose. I can't fault them for wanting to be here illegally. But after they get here and find work and have continued to be here for a number of years, I as an American want them to get a Social Security number and pay taxes...just like I do.

Not to get into an extended political discussion, but "they" pay taxes. Often times, they have bogus Social Security numbers (to satisfy employers) and if they do, they have payroll taxes deducted that they never file for and recover. Almost every state and city has a sales tax, so everytime they purchase something they pay taxes. Landlords have the cost of the property tax built into the rent, so they are paying property tax. The idea that "they" don't pay taxes like "we" do is nothing more than a anti-immigration myth. Like CZMDM, sorry for the rant.
  • 1

#9 Guest_pecosgirl_*

Guest_pecosgirl_*
  • Guests

Posted 17 October 2010 - 04:41 PM

Lots and lots of people around here get paid in cash "under the table"...so no taxes are taken out. But yeah, you're right. No point in ranting. It doesn't make me angry...much..because it's just the ways things are around here. Sorry to hijack.
  • 0

#10 Rachael

Rachael

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Saint Paul, MN
  • Interests:volleyball, horseback riding, swimming, dancing, singing, relaxing with friends and a good movie, learning about new cultures, perfecting a Spanish (never ending!) I love animals, I love history and culture, eating amazing food. I love exploring, I really want to learn how to surf and dive. I love to travel and try new things.

Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:34 AM

I would just like to point out that 50% of my friends here in the US are illegal immigrants and the don't get paid under the table. They have bogus SS# so the taxes are taken directly out of the pay checks the same as ours... the difference is that when we file our taxes we are able to get some of that money back whereas they don't. So in that way there are helping our government. Honestly most people just don't understand the facts.  Its not necesarily their fault that they think that, but with half the government saying those things its hard not to believe it. There are both negative and positive effect from illegal immigrants living and working in the US the same as EVERYTHING has positive and negative effects. Thats just life and nothing is perfect. Getting rid of illegal immigrants will help with some things bit, will also cause problems in other areas. It called cause and effect. There isn't a reason to make uninformative comments as the one that started this ranting. 


  • 2

#11 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,621 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 01 January 2014 - 11:31 AM

I guess only in the states can someone feel that they can simply break the law because THEY want what's on the other side.

 

So many wait years for the opportunity to become legal, to achieve citizenship.  But as long as their are boarder jumpers, all will be under suspicion.

 

I had to jump through hoops to live here, I had to PROVE I was not going to be a burden on society, doesn't the US have those same right to ask the same of the people who want to live in the US?

 

Is the immigration policies screwed up, yes.  But so is the mindset of those who feel ENTITLED to have what they haven't earned.


  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#12 Rachael

Rachael

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Saint Paul, MN
  • Interests:volleyball, horseback riding, swimming, dancing, singing, relaxing with friends and a good movie, learning about new cultures, perfecting a Spanish (never ending!) I love animals, I love history and culture, eating amazing food. I love exploring, I really want to learn how to surf and dive. I love to travel and try new things.

Posted 01 January 2014 - 12:15 PM

I do agree with that also.


  • 0

#13 cvchief

cvchief

    Professional Amateur

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,421 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania mostly, though Coz as much as possible

Posted 01 January 2014 - 03:18 PM

It is sort of amusing, that on one hand we hear lectures about don't move to Coz as there are rules and you MUST follow them. Then someone mentions rules north of the border and gets accused of racism.   Not very goose and gander....


  • 1

El Jefe

Wishing I was retiring to Cozumel.....

Casa De Jefe


#14 CZMDM

CZMDM

    Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 811 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cozumel Island.

Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:26 PM

f


  • 0

Cozumel Diving


#15 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 02 January 2014 - 02:22 AM

This is an old thread, but demonstrates how little things change. I got out my Duck Dynasty Bigotry Detector to check and yes, U.S. policy and attitudes are largely racist. But hey, things change little in 400 years.

 

Mexicans have flooded the U.S. and taken all the good stoop labor agricultural jobs. This has caused the unemployment of millions of Americans. Countless Americans grew up expecting to be able to follow in the footsteps of their parents, grandparents and previous generations and become migrant laborers. People who came from generations of bean pickers, fruit harvesters, used to following the seasons are unable to find work.

 

Many in desperation looked south of the border in hopes that their dreams could remain alive. Low and behold, they found that large, corporate farms in Mexico were even more mechanized than in the States. Indeed it was agribusiness giant harvesting tractors that had fanned the immigration north. Only in the States did corporate farms find a disposable manual labor force to be cheaper than going mechanical. What these job seekers found in Mexico were that the only jobs available to them were relatively good paying jobs (by Mexican standards) and job vacancies more often existed only in businesses that under reported cash income and might be able to pay cash under the table.

 

Just because the U.S. stole half of Mexican land away, some Mexicans (and their liberal supporters) feel they have the right to trespass. Just because their ancestors explored and helped settle the land, the U.S. stole it all fair and square. The Monroe Doctrine going back to 1823 established the legal basis that only Christian White Americans could exploit Latin America.

 

The 13th Amendment of the Constitution caused a major hardship for corporate America. Wanting to better control the costs of labor, when the 13th Amendment went into effect, millions entered the job seeking labor pool. Share cropping offered a partial solution for a very limited time. Now facing the threat of over seas mechanical competition, agribusiness found that able bodied humans could perform the work more effectively and properly managed, Mexican stoop labor offered lower costs.

 

Come on people, can you imagine white Americans actually doing manual labor, harvesting lettuce, picking peaches, the grunt, knees on the ground work under a searing hot sun? Imagine the harvest and if paid based upon their volume productivity, paid by the basket or bushel picked, in support of an all American labor force, people wouldn't mind paying a few dollars extra for a tomato. I pay over $3 dollars for avocados now. Likewise if citrus fruit, apples etc. could be harvested by Americans, if each apple, every orange only cost a few dollars more. Sure it is often hot in many prime growing areas and workers would require regular rest breaks, chilled beverages and shade. On a related topic, you almost can't find a non-Mexican roofer anymore. Somehow they seem acclimated to enduring scorching heat without complaint.

 

Let's see...North Americans sometimes go south and work illegally which displaces a potentially well qualified Mexican from a good paying job.  Mexicans sometimes travel north and work illegal jobs that NO ONE WANTS! As has been stated, most likely using false credentials which pay money into the system without any benefits either short term or in distant future.

 

What about all the North American property owners that have been avoiding taxes on rental properties for years? Well, when sooner or later caught, it will be like the illegal worker in the States that gets deported without warning and loses all their assets whether that be their cars, their households, bank savings etc. They were illegal, they knew it and shouldn't have been doing it. It serves them right. Just like those unlicensed rental properties that don't pay taxes and compete with tax revenue producing hotels and legal rentals. When they face confiscation, do not pass go, do not collect $100 dollars. Oh the howling that will be heard and the double standard expectations. Well I would have been legal if I could.....but you couldn't. No one has the entitlement mindset more strongly than Americans (U.S.)

 

On the subject of America and Americans, people from South America consider themselves Americans too. Mexico considers people from the U.S. or Canada to be North Americans regardless of what NAFTA says.


  • 2

#16 marlinfishing

marlinfishing

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 182 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Plano, TX
  • Interests:Deep sea fishing, college football, NFL & relaxing...

Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:58 PM

This is an old thread, but demonstrates how little things change. I got out my Duck Dynasty Bigotry Detector to check and yes, U.S. policy and attitudes are largely racist. But hey, things change little in 400 years.

 

Mexicans have flooded the U.S. and taken all the good stoop labor agricultural jobs. This has caused the unemployment of millions of Americans. Countless Americans grew up expecting to be able to follow in the footsteps of their parents, grandparents and previous generations and become migrant laborers. People who came from generations of bean pickers, fruit harvesters, used to following the seasons are unable to find work.

 

Many in desperation looked south of the border in hopes that their dreams could remain alive. Low and behold, they found that large, corporate farms in Mexico were even more mechanized than in the States. Indeed it was agribusiness giant harvesting tractors that had fanned the immigration north. Only in the States did corporate farms find a disposable manual labor force to be cheaper than going mechanical. What these job seekers found in Mexico were that the only jobs available to them were relatively good paying jobs (by Mexican standards) and job vacancies more often existed only in businesses that under reported cash income and might be able to pay cash under the table.

 

Just because the U.S. stole half of Mexican land away, some Mexicans (and their liberal supporters) feel they have the right to trespass. Just because their ancestors explored and helped settle the land, the U.S. stole it all fair and square. The Monroe Doctrine going back to 1823 established the legal basis that only Christian White Americans could exploit Latin America.

 

The 13th Amendment of the Constitution caused a major hardship for corporate America. Wanting to better control the costs of labor, when the 13th Amendment went into effect, millions entered the job seeking labor pool. Share cropping offered a partial solution for a very limited time. Now facing the threat of over seas mechanical competition, agribusiness found that able bodied humans could perform the work more effectively and properly managed, Mexican stoop labor offered lower costs.

 

Come on people, can you imagine white Americans actually doing manual labor, harvesting lettuce, picking peaches, the grunt, knees on the ground work under a searing hot sun? Imagine the harvest and if paid based upon their volume productivity, paid by the basket or bushel picked, in support of an all American labor force, people wouldn't mind paying a few dollars extra for a tomato. I pay over $3 dollars for avocados now. Likewise if citrus fruit, apples etc. could be harvested by Americans, if each apple, every orange only cost a few dollars more. Sure it is often hot in many prime growing areas and workers would require regular rest breaks, chilled beverages and shade. On a related topic, you almost can't find a non-Mexican roofer anymore. Somehow they seem acclimated to enduring scorching heat without complaint.

 

Let's see...North Americans sometimes go south and work illegally which displaces a potentially well qualified Mexican from a good paying job.  Mexicans sometimes travel north and work illegal jobs that NO ONE WANTS! As has been stated, most likely using false credentials which pay money into the system without any benefits either short term or in distant future.

 

What about all the North American property owners that have been avoiding taxes on rental properties for years? Well, when sooner or later caught, it will be like the illegal worker in the States that gets deported without warning and loses all their assets whether that be their cars, their households, bank savings etc. They were illegal, they knew it and shouldn't have been doing it. It serves them right. Just like those unlicensed rental properties that don't pay taxes and compete with tax revenue producing hotels and legal rentals. When they face confiscation, do not pass go, do not collect $100 dollars. Oh the howling that will be heard and the double standard expectations. Well I would have been legal if I could.....but you couldn't. No one has the entitlement mindset more strongly than Americans (U.S.)

 

On the subject of America and Americans, people from South America consider themselves Americans too. Mexico considers people from the U.S. or Canada to be North Americans regardless of what NAFTA says.

Well said.


  • 0

"We live in a culture of simulation, in which nothing is what it seems and the image that reigns has no reference to the real world."  (The Art Of War, Sun Tzu)  It is what it is...  THAT never changes.


#17 Design Kim

Design Kim

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Chicago

Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:02 PM

Excellent post, Charles.


  • 0

#18 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:12 AM

If you can't laugh at the absurdity, you'll be crying all the time. On a related note, remittances from the States sent home to Mexico have dropped dramatically. These remittances actually exceeded all the foreign currency obtained from foreign tourism to show the former importance of this source of income to Mexico.


  • 0

#19 sadiesue

sadiesue

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 17 January 2014 - 04:27 PM

First I want to say I'm not against any nationality but if they want to live in a foreign country they need to do it legally. I can't believe people actually use the example of illegal immigrants using someone else's social security number as a way to say that there paying taxes. Most of the ssn's that are used are from people that are still living. After working for a company 10 years and filing taxes and seeing this first hand. If someone takes your ssn they can complete destroy your credit and your life. You have to prove that you are who you say you are and believe it or not it takes thousand of dollars and a whole lot of time. I've seen people have to go into banruptcy trying to get this straighted out. In the mean time the person using there number just goes out and buys another ssn this is not a victimless crime.
  • 0

#20 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 18 January 2014 - 12:52 AM

 There is a great deal of official governmental hypocrisy on both sides of the border. Many have too much invested in the status quo. The present system serves the select few, while totally disregarding those pawns caught in the middle. During World War II the guest worker program for Mexicans was invaluable in providing a desperately needed labor force to fill the need created by the war effort. Without the participation of guest workers from Mexico, the war on the home front might have been different. Too bad many did not receive the monies held to be paid after their return to Mexico.

 

As mentioned here, countless North Americans illegally rent out unlicensed condo/villas. Not only to they not pay the 16% IVA, the 3% hospitality tax, in direct competition with those who do. They also skip additional income taxes. No difference if rental income is paid within the States and reported to the IRS, the law requires filing and paying taxes to SAT. That would be like using workers on tourist visas in the States, but making payments to Mexican accounts (I've seen that one). The Cozumel government has threatened to begin enforcement, it is regularly mentioned in the press and the simplicity of surveying the Internet and matching rentals with property records. These laws have been strictly enforced for years in popular gringo localities along the Pacific Coast. Letters are sent each year in both Spanish and English, reminding property owners of their responsibilities and restrictions. So far enforcement has been prevented. The construction boom may continue which has benefited the contractors, property owners and material suppliers. There is a somewhat finite amount of land which is diminishing. These are Federal regulations and if local and State agencies neglect their duties, eventually the Feds will. These illegal renters can face deportation, future returns blocked; hefty fines, back taxes, interest, recomputed higher utility rates, more fines, more interest or in simplicity, confiscation. Much like the illegal worker caught in the States, they lose whatever they have in possessions with immediate deportation. Besides the unfair competition to those who do pay their taxes, that 3% hospitality tax is suppose to go toward tourism promotion which should benefit many people.

 

Many Americans would be amazed at the number of temporary work visas purchased ($1,500 bucks) to enable foreign workers to work in the States. This really hurts in places with high unemployment. There is no requirement of experience or technical skills that locals citizens might not possess. If you want to see a real winner, look at the abuse of student hospitality J-1 visas. These provide a good supply of low pay employees, that can be housed in conditions subhuman, work long hours, often at work inappropriate to it's stated purpose. My work with tourism in Alaska, a very International clientele, I hear countless complaints from foreign visitors that did not expect to encounter problems in the States with workers who could not speak basic English. Many, many Eastern European and Mexican workers are encountered that present communication problems with tourists whom English is a second language.

 

Back to the thread topic of Americans/foreigners working in Mexico, Mexico is very protective of their own labor market. Any company that wishes to hire a foreigner is required to maintain a ratio of Mexican to foreign workers (8 to 1, 10 to 1) and certain jobs are restricted to Mexican only. A foreign worker is suppose to possess skills unavailable locally. When the U.S. rewrites their immigration and worker policies, perhaps they can gain some inspiration from Mexican codes.

 

Canada has had very successful guest worker programs where a needed labour force could not be fulfilled locally. A classic was their importation of meat cutters and poultry processing workers. Good wages, travel expenses, health and dental provided. This was implemented when job vacancies could not be filled. Hey, carpel tunnel syndrome usually takes some time to develop and most cuts or accidental amputations can be stitched. Once again Mexicans stole jobs that were difficult, dangerous and that no one wanted.

 

Mexico is slowly addressing the situation of so many of their highly skilled and educated citizens that after college, they accept jobs outside the country. Many work for multinational companies in South America, Europe and various non-Spanish speaking countries too. Of the more "civilized" countries in the world, few have situations as we see in the United States of Mexico nor in the United States of America.


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users