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Havana Club Rum


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#1 dawnb

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 03:55 PM

Can we bring it back to the States? Or is it treated like cigars? Not a bad rum, don't want to lose it!
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#2 CZMDM

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 05:05 PM

Isn't that just the house name for the rum? If so no worries. If it came from Cuba it is subject to seizure.
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#3 dawnb

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 05:11 PM

Says it s made in Cuba. Do we have to drink it here? Not that I have a problem with that....just would like to bring some home.
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#4 dawnb

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 05:15 PM

Thanks Mike. I think you answered my question. Guess we wil start now!
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#5 CZMDM

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 05:35 PM

Cool I'll be over at 8.
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#6 Charles

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 09:03 PM

If it says made in Cuba, you can always transfer the contents into a bottle from somewhere else. Just like cigars, use packaging and bands from made in Mexico or the Dominican Republic.

I have never heard of anyone ever receiving the maximum penalty for importing (smuggling) Cuban products. After-all, the worst that could happen, the maximum penalty is only up to 10 years in Federal prison and a fine of up to $400,000 dollars (again, that hasn't happened yet). A very small price to pay to live in the land of the free. Since U.S. has customs and immigration officials working the Cancun airport along side Mexican, I don't feel safe traveling to Cuba that I wouldn't be an example case. What madness, I used to have friends in Key West with apartments and girl friends in La Habana and they would sail over monthly. Fifty years of failed U.S. foreign policy and don Fidel, the Bearded One has managed to survive through ten U.S. presidential administrations.
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#7 dawnb

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 09:51 PM

Drat. Now it's gone. Guess it's Bacardi from now on. Will pour into something else. Thanks Charles and Mike!
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#8 CZMDM

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 08:37 AM

Yes, for whatever reason they are keeping an eye on people going to Cuba more than before. I think the fine can be up to $50k. Per getting caught with rum or cigars....it's doubtful that anything would happen other than it being taken away, unless you were carrying enough for commercial purposes. People think of Cuba as some closed off little secret place. The fact of the matter is that Cuba has visitor from all over the world. The USA is the only country that has a problem with them.
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#9 dawnb

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 08:53 AM

Cuba has been on our "bucket list" for years. Would love to visit and snorkel there, but legally.
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#10 TRAVELER89

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:46 AM

If you like Cuban Ron, you should also try Varadero(in Mega) seven years old....., You should also try rons from Central America, Flor de Caña Rum from Chichigalpa, Nicaragua: http://www.flordecana.com/index.php or Ron Zacapa from Guatemala: http://www.ministryo...tails.php?r=444 Do you homework....., read, read, read!

Cuban rum brands and production information: http://havanajournal...viewthread/597/


T
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#11 dawnb

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 02:39 PM

Great info, Traveler, Thanks! On our way to Mega now!
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#12 obispo

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 02:49 PM

Some folks think Havana Club is the "best" rum! That said, I habitually bring it back from frequent trips to Spain. It has never been confiscated by customs. I would not compare the rum to cuban cigars, because most of the cigars are not cuban and the revenue stamps that say they're cuban are counterfeit. I was told this by a customs' official. I've only seen red and black label Havana Club. The black label is aged longer (7 years I think). Good luck smuggling.
obispo
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#13 diverdicozumel

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 08:09 PM

Bacardi is Cuban rum. The original. The cuban government started to manufacture Havana Club after the Bacardi family fled Cuba.
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#14 dawnb

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 09:20 PM

No worries. Took both Varadura and Havana Club back in check in bags. My husband did have two small bottles of mouthwash confiscated from his 3-1-1 in carry on bag due to them not having a label, just little travel bottles. Guess it depends on the day. Well worth the sacrifice.
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#15 cozdaddy

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Posted 21 March 2011 - 05:53 PM

I used to bring back several bottles of the Havana Club 7year old and a bottle of the 15 year old every trip until the 15 year old reached $160.00 a bottle at which time I needed to a rum that was less expensive and as good or better than the 15 yearold. Well I succeded Ron Zacapa is better than the Havava club and cheaper at about $30.00 a bottle. I also like the Ron El Dorado 15yoa hope I can find that in Cozumel. The Zacapa XO is fantastic rum about $100.00 a bottle but well worth it if your a connisuer. We still bring a couple of Bottles back when we get down to COZ.
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Breath in Breath out move on

#16 John D

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 08:02 AM

Charles there is no US Customs/Immigration (CBP) at the Cancun airport. Even if there was and there is not, they have ZERO authority to asses fines etc.
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#17 Charles

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 10:52 AM

Charles there is no US Customs/Immigration (CBP) at the Cancun airport. Even if there was and there is not, they have ZERO authority to asses fines etc.


I guess you know more than what is reported in the press. Por Esto! that has numerous instances of reporting information initially denied by U.S. officials, but later confirmed after legal battles of Freedom of Information disclosures. I don't know of any denial in this instance as there are various customs and border patrol agents working in Mexico.

Yes, I agree that there is no pre-clearance screening at the airport like you will find in the Bahamas, in Canada, even in the USVI where you pass through U.S. customs, provide declaration documents outside U.S. soil and your arrival flight is treated as a domestic arrival. I also would assume they would have no authority to assess fines, at least not in Mexico. Given the history of Mexican INM staff at the Cancun airport, the sky is the limit for potential shakedowns and/or the cooperative exchange of information. Here is the original Por Esto article taken from UNIVERSAL January 02, 2010. http://www.poresto.n...ews.cgi?f=25116



CBP Assistant Commissioner Gina Testifies on Border Security and Partnerships, Collaborations with Mexico

(Thursday, May 27, 2010) http://www.cbp.gov/x...gina_mexico.xml

Last month two ICE agents were ambushed, one killed while driving between Mexico City and Monterrey. They were on "official business", but not conducting an investigation. This attack had been reported as a case of mistaken identity, that despite diplomatic plates on the vehicle, the occupants were assumed to be members of a rival cartel.

Considering the disgraceful history of U.S. State Department officials..... Jeffrey Davidow (appointed by Clinton) http://en.wikipedia....Jeffrey_Davidow (Guatemala & Chile)
Davidow resigned as the U.S. feared possible indictments made by the world court against Davidow and Henry Kissinger for assorted war crimes during the Nixon era.

Tony Garza was appointed by George Bush as replacement ambassador. Garza managed to do very, very well during his tenure by marrying not just Mexico's richest woman, but the richest woman in all of Latin America. We should all be so lucky as to marry a billionaire, it is never to late to get lucky in love.

Carlos Pascual (Obama appointee) resigned on Saturday March 19th, 2011 over the recent wikileaks disclosures http://www.huffingto...s_n_838047.html

On a side note, both Hilliary Clinton as First Lady now our Secretary of State and George and Laura Bush, had the opportunity to enjoy the hospitality of Mexican Narco-Banker Roberto Hernandez during official State visits to the Yucatan. It is "high" time President Obama and Michelle come for a visit and get a first hand look and taste of the economic benefits and riches provided to a few. Roberto Hernandez a glorious example of a true rags to riches story: "I got turned down for an American Express card in 1986 'cause I was too poor, but I sold Banamex (after the U.S. bailout) for $20 billion dollars. That is a nice turn around of personal finances made while Mario Villanueva was governor, during the period that DEA estimates of 85% of the cocaine destined for the U.S. originally entered Mexico through the cocaine triangle of Chetumal to Cancun with Cozumel as the apex.

Personally I have no idea what Homeland InSecurity or the Customs and Border Patrol may be doing now in Mexico. My guess is they don't know what they are doing based upon the history of performance. The information regarding the Cancun airport was with regard to screening passenger lists for flights into Mexico to check for possible security threats that might be using Mexico as a route for eventual entry into the U.S. illegally. Just like all the Cubans that get smuggled into the area, Cancun, Isla Mujeres and our very own Passion Island, it is difficult to see any benefit/reward to U.S. efforts in the region. Given the extensive history of the operation of the Cancun airport, it has to be carefully watched and monitored by a variety of reasons. It is an outrage for a "free" country to continue a completely failed and flawed policy against Cuba. No arm twisting has ever brought even our closest allies to support U.S. policy. Tourists entering Cuba are granted a 30 day visa and they have the right to petition for an additional 30 day extension. In consideration of the long time support by Canadians and their government, thumbing their noses at U.S. policy, Canadians citizens are the only ones with the special privilege of being granted six month tourist visa.

I believe I managed to download the entire last round of wikileaks which contain assorted sensitive information about U.S. policy and communications in Mexico, but I have not had a chance to try to examine the content and disclosures.
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#18 John D

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 05:43 PM

Wow I thought we were talking about CBP officers assigned to work at CUN. It pretty obvious this was a special operation designed to prevent illegals traveling from the Cancun airport to the United States. Not to seek out Americans traveling to Cuba. CBP was working under the authority Mexican government and had absolutely zero authority to make any arrests or asses any fines. Any yes I have first hand information about CBP operations as my wife recently retired from a Senior executive level Position in CBP.

At any rate I really don't want to get in a political debate on this website...
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#19 Charles

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 07:02 PM

My reply was intended as much for our local forum member "Cuban travel" expert that flaunts her travel while making treasonous statements about the president. CBP agents were looking (my understanding) at passenger manifests, looking for anyone that might appear on "watch lists" or have name spellings somewhat similar on the remote chance they might later attempt to travel to the U.S. Mexico has no problem with racial nor ethnic profiling. It was extending U.S. foreign travel passenger list screening to occur beyond the U.S. border. Customs can use advance screening time of persons who might attempt travel to the U.S. so they don't have situations of planes being diverted like with Yusuf Islam (formerly known as Cat Stevens) who was traveling to meet with Dolly Parton "supposedly" regarding her recording his songs. God knows what they could have had planned, but Dolly Parton airport porn scan photos today would be an obvious hit!

Many Americans go to Cuba without problems and without flaunting it on the Internet. My point, don't assume that you are without risk of repercussions by the State Department because your travel is originating in Mexico. I had just heard of the latest U.S. Ambassador resignation that happened on Saturday. I wonder who might get the next appointment.

I can't give better than a D- grade to the majority of U.S. State Department officials working in Mexico. They don't seem very effective at protecting American interests nor in improving relations between the two countries, the Tony Garza personal relations excepted. This was not intended as an observation or comment regarding CBP agents.
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#20 MarkC

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 11:55 AM

Sorry to be the bad guy, but I hope any American buying Cuban products or traveling there illegally is prosecuted to the full extent of the law with the maximum amount of punishment.
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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”




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