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#1 hillbilly

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 10:31 AM

So I am sitting around doing nothing on a sunday morning reading articles about solar power usage doubling each year and got to thinking that I have not read anything on the forums about solar power being used to supplement power there in sunny cozumel.Is it used there? Does it blow off the roof during hurricanes? Is it not promoted by the local government? Is this a stupid question?
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#2 cvchief

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 10:46 AM

I know up here there are assorted tax breaks that pay for about half and then it still takes maybe 5-10 years to pay itself off before you start getting ahead, more or less. Have to wonder about 'better' sun down there?
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#3 GringaErin

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:17 AM

http://www.homepowercozumel.org/
http://greencozumel.wordpress.com/

Good starting points.

I've also seen solar powered hot water heaters on the island, although, I'm not sure what you would do with it in a hurricane...
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#4 Carey

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:35 AM

I know up here there are assorted tax breaks that pay for about half and then it still takes maybe 5-10 years to pay itself off before you start getting ahead, more or less. Have to wonder about 'better' sun down there?


Here's an interesting comment I found on this thread: http://www.greentech...gy-opportunity/

He is reporting on a hotel near the beach and what he's been doing. Posted in May of 2011. I don't think the Mexican government gives any tax credits for feeding back into the grid. But from what I read, if you set up your system right, you'll use it all in your household anyway and none will make it back to the grid. The post quoted below does make a very good point re the life expectancy of solar panels in the salty, wind blown place we live.

"We have a small hotel on the beach in southern Mexico built with solar energy in mind - yet I have a hard time imagining running the hotel profitably on solar. Solar hot water yes, due to no frost I installed pool type panels in a gravity loop system on the roof to go with 1/2 our roof mounted water tanks. Electrical load minimized with inverter based motors for our pool pump - 120 watts for 20 gallon per minute, Front loadl washer, and only now installing inverter based mini split airconditioners as it has taken this long for the technology to reach Tapachula, 2 so far with 5 more on order. Building was built with http://www.tridipanel.com style insulated construction. Windows utilize maximum overhangs for minimum heat build up. Sheets are sun dried. Lighting T5 and pool and emergency lighting are LED. I envision adding a solar water pasturization system with filtration using similar pool panel type heaters. I also would like to add solar panels but think 1 circuit of 120 volts running something like a washer may take 10 amps, in 12 volt terms thats 100 amps. A 12,000 BTU inverter air conditioner running at 50% due to our insulated rooms is still going to be in the range of 4 to 500 watts. I think electricity is in the 28 cent kilowatt range. I have doubts about running everything on solar but I can see a justification in having it push into the grid and being available when the grid is down for drinking water pumping and lighting applications and perhaps our current ceiling fans, it would certainly help in that aspect if something better than batteries comes along - high capacity capacitors anyone? Being near the beach with its salt air only copper and concrete seem to survive, Anodized aluminum does last a few years, but I have my doubts if it will last 10, given that it makes me wonder about the feasibility of Solar panels or Thin film near the ocean. Ken http://www.playalindahotel.com"
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#5 CZMDM

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 01:41 PM

Go talk to Larry Cleghorn at Scuba Repair. They do sales and installation.
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#6 cvchief

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 04:13 PM

Sun and Air? Makes sense....
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#7 DJDiverDan

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 04:50 PM

Being in Cozumel, you have another ready source of energy which is much more consistent than the sun, and which can be effectively insulated from Hurricanes. I'm speaking of the nearly constant ocean current which runs just off your coast. The capital cost up front is large, and the engineering is daunting, but imagine, if you will, a series of large turbines, driven by ocean currents, attached to the walls descending from your reefs (at a depth designed to minimize interference with reef life - say 300 feet or more, and designed with excluders to prevent injury or death to large fish, like sharks and eagle rays which hunt at such depths), using ocean currents to generate electricity which can be fed through buried and insulated cabling into the Cozumel power grid. Amazing work has already been done in developing turbines to harness tidal power in some oceanside areas in the United States, and I can't help but think that these could be easily adapted to harness Cozumel's Ocean currents. I would think the same thing could be accomplished in the Florida Keys, where the Gulf Stream is funnelled into a fairly small area between Florida and Cuba, and in many other communities along the East Coast of the United States with strong & constant south to north currents just offshore. Any Scuba Diving power engineers out there who want to help develop renewable energy in Cozumel?
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#8 imkennedy

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 10:18 PM

Any Scuba Diving power engineers out there who want to help develop renewable energy in Cozumel?

I am a scuba diving Mechanical Engineering professor at University of California - and Cozumel home owner. As with all these things, costs are paramount. There may not be a big enough electric market in Cozumel and even in Playa and Cancun to make this feasible. Capital costs and maintenance are high. The technology seems to be still in its infancy. wind power is easier to to. There are some interesting links on the subject of current energy at
http://ocsenergy.anl...rrent/index.cfm
http://ocsenergy.anl...06_2006_web.pdf
http://ocsenergy.anl...per_Current.pdf

The map of ocean currents around the US certainly shows the potential of Cozumel/Yucatan
It would be great to be able to develop a feasible technology for this area - but it requires deep pockets. Maybe Richard Branson could offer an X, Y Or Z prize.
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#9 DJDiverDan

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 09:16 AM

I am a scuba diving Mechanical Engineering professor at University of California - and Cozumel home owner. As with all these things, costs are paramount. There may not be a big enough electric market in Cozumel and even in Playa and Cancun to make this feasible. Capital costs and maintenance are high. The technology seems to be still in its infancy. wind power is easier to to. There are some interesting links on the subject of current energy at
http://ocsenergy.anl...rrent/index.cfm
http://ocsenergy.anl...06_2006_web.pdf
http://ocsenergy.anl...per_Current.pdf

The map of ocean currents around the US certainly shows the potential of Cozumel/Yucatan
It would be great to be able to develop a feasible technology for this area - but it requires deep pockets. Maybe Richard Branson could offer an X, Y Or Z prize.


I'm just a curious layperson, but I read a lot. I am aware of some of the demonstration projects that have been done on Tidal Power generation, and it just strikes me that current power ought to be easier, from an engineering point of view, since you don't need to worry about reversible turbines (the current is always in one direction, as opposed to tides, which reverse), and the current is nearly contant (meaning you can probably do without variable pitch blades on the turbines, and the power generation is much more reliable than either wind or solar), while tidal generation (assuming you capture energy from the tides both coming in and going out, twice a day) is only periodic. Granted that only a 1.5 to 2 kt. current is not moving as fast as the tides in some areas (the tidal surge in the Bay of Fundy is AWESOME), but given the density of energy from the fluid flow, as opposed to wind flow, the energy potential from a 2 kt. current of dense saltwater far exceeds that from a 30 or 40 kt. wind. I am aware that huge upfront capital costs would be required, and Mexico's political situation pretty much excludes foreign investment in this area while limiting government funding (Mexico has basically starved PEMEX so that Mexico Oil & Gas Production is on the decline while PEMEX cannot obtained the funds needed for exploration and development to replace its depleting reserves). It's a shame that Cozumel will have to wait on this technology until it has been developed in countries with investment policies more open to investment in innovation.
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#10 hillbilly

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 05:24 PM

Wow , plenty of good info when you post a question on this forum. Darn I guess I should have said that I only wanted to run a couple of fans.There are some folks out there that know a bunch more than my dumb ass.
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#11 Charles

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 09:15 PM

Hillbilly, I'd talk to Larry Cleghorn as suggested. I have friends that live in Pueblo Fantasma and they are self sufficient in generating power from a combination of methods. They don't have CFE! I'll get out there sometime in the coming months to see their place. Anything that reduces reliance on CFE is a good thing, not a dumb question at all. You're more likely to start and succeed in small steps.
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#12 hillbilly

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 06:41 AM

Thanks, Charles and Mike. Looks like we will talk to scuba repair.
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#13 Jay

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 12:16 PM

I know this is an older post but wondering if anyone has any newer info on availability and cost of solar water heating on the island? Thanks

 

Jay


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#14 Danielh

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 03:21 PM

check out Nemecio at http://coolcozumel.com/

does solar and solar water heaters.


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#15 ccannon707

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 04:37 PM

Comment and questions are also on current Cozumel4You Facebook thread. Looks like CFE may be promoting solar as well. Solar seems like a no-brainer in such a sunny place, but the question of what happens in a hurricane is pertinent.


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...Christine

 

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#16 Carey

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 05:51 PM

oh you'd have to take it down in a hurricane alright.  That would have to be on the list along with securing large gates so they don't vibrate in the wind and bringing in anything that might fly away and injure persons or properties.


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