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Problems Obtaining A Menaje de Casa from Cozumel


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#21 Ron

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 06:09 AM

I just read on another board that you no longer need a Menaje de Casa. YOu make a list of what is being shipped and give it to your shipper and the will take care of the paperwork with the Mexican authorities. Call your shipper and speak to them about the change in the law.
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#22 chris in cozumel

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 12:20 PM

According to our Customs Broker, the menaje De Casa is still requied at this time. My broker has sent the paperwork this previous Saturday. I spoke with the broker today and she is going to call them today.
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#23 Coz2wonder

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 12:41 PM

Menaje de Casa will NEVER go away. Perhaps, they are going to call it something else, but that is your declaration of what you are importing into a country.

It does not matter if it's Mexico, Canada, or England...you MUST document what you are bringing in.

This is why you hired an expert to provide you with the process and documents you need to ensure your move is successful.

One suggestion that I made to Ron was to hire a QUALIFIED mover to just process the document across the boarder, and he would do his own transport.

It is only my OPINION (based on others experiences who have posted here) that moving yourself is not that big of a deal crossing the boarder. BUT, you need your documents in order, and that is what are transporting across the boarder.

I would hate for anybody to get to the boarder loaded for bear, and when asked for specific documents that are needed, the response is "well I read on a website I didn't need it".

This by far is the MOST difficult part of any move, to any country.

As to other website, and opinions (including mine) it is just that, OPINIONS.

Ask an EXPERT in the field...an EXPERT are the people who move the freight for a living. They are the ones who know the rules and regs. If they don't...they won't be in business very long.
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#24 Charles

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 02:20 PM

As far as I know, it was/is my understanding the law takes EFFECT on May 1st. Who knows when the start date will be or was that will AFFECT this process. The menaje de casa is for foreigners moving to Mexico, it does not work for Mexicans who have lived abroad for decades and wish to return to their homeland.

I remember the story of a retired employee of a multinational oil company. Soon after graduation from college with his degrees, he went to work for a corporation in Mexico, but was soon transferred to work in South America. After a number of years, the company transferred him to Africa and he worked there for a decade in several different countries. He next worked in the Middle East and then later the Far East. He worked for a handful of years in Europe before his final transfer to the United States and soon after, his retirement and drawing his pension.

All during his career which spanned more than four decade, four continents, perhaps a dozen of more countries. Each time he moved, his employer handled all the shipping and transport of household goods. In every place he and his family lived, they collected art, cultural artifacts, the countless items which define who your are and where you have been. He sounded like an especially remarkable and successful individual. It had been his intention to one day return to his homeland, the land of his birth to live out his final years and one day die in the country he identified himself as a Mexican, although the majority of his life he had lived outside the country with only occasional visits to relatives that lived in Mexico..

Crossing every border had different sets of rules and regulations that were very easy to comply with, he had never experienced any problem and the actual transport was with professional movers paid for by his employer. BUT when this Mexican wanted to return to his homeland, it was the only country that had ever presented an obstacle. It was basically impossible to comply with the requirements for a Mexican as to cost, value, country of origin etc. Picture a world citizen and well paid executive, that collected numerous household items over the years. Some might have been purchased from primitive markets, some from world class art galleries, some items had significant monetary value, others were purely sentimental. He had always saved what meant the most to him, the objects which he wanted to surround himself as reminders of a successful and extremely well traveled life. Mexico basically imposed an impossible barrier for a Mexican to return to his homeland. He probably could have taken various citizenship over the years and long given up his Mexican passport and citizenship. Had he become a citizen of another country, then he would have had to only go through the process of FM3 and menaje de casa process, but since out of love and respect for his homeland and his lifetime intention of returning to Mexico.....he had all of his household items in storage for six years as he explored different avenues of possible importation in a legal manner. Besides being extremely expensive in the taxes that would be imposed on a Mexican, it was impossible to document assorted items and artifacts, their cost, value and country of origin collected over more than forty years.

As far as I know, the law was to change on May 1st. To my knowledge, no one has knowledge of what the procedures will be or the interpretation of the law. At first glance, there appears to be some conflicts with the practicality of reality. The law was drafted and passed by Congress. Just like in the U.S. Congress can pass a law and then it is passed on to figure out how it can be implemented.

The law regarding sale of antibiotics took effect April 1st that require a written prescription. None of the pharmacy managers nor the owner of Dori has a clue as to when and how the law will go into effect. It has a partial foundation of legitimacy and validity of its intentions. It has a major conflict with reality and practicality of being implemented. The cell phone registration law was to take effect on April 10th and it may or may not have been extended the deadline an additional six months as there is still a large number not in compliance.

Who knows about these new rules regarding FM3/FM2. About the only thing that has been stated with consistency was that Consulates would no longer be able to issue the initial application. As I have said, Consulates are not consistent in the requirements, few really knew what they were doing. I have long thought I could shop around for a friendly Consulate and get an FM3 issued for a rocking chair or a dog. It basically came down to Americans wanting to give them money for a glorified visa so they were accomodating and it made people happy. Often problems arose later when Consulate workers who did not know the true requirements, their lack of expertise later lead to problems for both Mexico as well as the holder when they went in for their initial registration and subsequent renewals. I have heard of people that simple went to a Consulate (same) and simply got a new FM3 each year, both rentista and working FM3a. Apple tours long had a process that they sent their employees to Chicago each year and merely got them brand new FM3s as it was easier and cheaper for their officers to deal with the local Consulate rather than the required renewal process here. It was considered a perk of the job to get a week vacation in Chicago. Unfortunate for those with intentions to one day go to FM2 and one day nationalization status as they never gained any time starting over each year.

I have my doubts that anyone knows really what is going on in the present situation. Some entities may have stopped issuing documents in anticipation that they will no longer be able to in the future, basically I don't believe anyone really knows what the status is during this window time between implementation.

Paula has offered her experience which is very current, BUT could change, but the foundation nad some of the items may change soon. Be very careful what you might read on the Internet from five, eight years ago, their experience and advice offered may have been valid originally at the time and location. Paula's is or was valid, but some of that may change some too. The basic foundation and core of what she reports should remain the same. Paula probably invested more time and energy in researching this over a long period of time than anyone else has had to as her situation was somewhat or could have been more comples and involved more items than many other moves, she pretty well had to cover all the different bases.

Good luck.
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#25 Coz2wonder

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:27 AM

I went on http://www.strommoving.com/id39.html

this is what I found

"Importation Rules and Regulations

The Law states that all persons moving Personal Household Belongings may bring these into the country Duty Free on a One-Time Basis providing that the items are at least six months of age and have been USED.

1. From the date of issue of the FM3, the importer has six (6) months to obtain the Inventory Visa which allows them to cross their goods duty free.
(*of course I brought my stuff in under an FM2)

If you are transporting your personal belongings in your vehicle, then you can do so without an Inventory Visa but you are required to make a formal declaration when entering Mexico and you are subject to paying IVA and possibly duty.

Because so many people moving to Mexico are not following the Rules and Regulations of the country, Customs is checking very carefully all household shipments for the presence of any of the items listed below.

I did not use this shipper, only because they do not service Cozumel.

I would still contact Marcos in regards to importing household goods to this side of Mexico.
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#26 Coz2wonder

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 04:07 PM

I found this under the Consulardo General De Mexico, phoenix office.
http://www.sre.gob.mx/phoenix/

On left hand side, look for "Services for Non Mexican".

A list of services, and description on a number of topics will pop up.

"Taking household effects

TAKING HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS INTO MEXICO

Foreign retired residents, as well as immigrants are entitled to take their household effects into Mexico. A list of such effects must be certified by the Mexican Consulate for Customs in Mexico. The requirements to be met are as follows:

- FM3 or FM2 issued in his name.

- A typed list of household effects, in Spanish, accompanied by four additional photocopies, listing all items to be imported. Brand, model and serial numbers must be stated when listing electrical appliances.

- Pay the consular fee (please see table of consular fees).

Once the household effects list has been visaed, all furniture and appliances must enter the country within the next six months as of the date of the issue of the immigration form. Household effects can be brought into Mexico only once per family in a lifetime without a special permit from Mexican Customs.

Only a suggestion, but perhaps this subject would be better under "I want to move to Cozumel"?
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#27 Ron

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 03:24 AM

I was now in contact with one mover and one broker
Both said you only need a Menaje de casa if you are a returning Mexican national foreigners do not need this.

Here is the reply from the broker

hanks Dave.

Hello Mr Mannes:

In order to clear customs at the mexican border, we need the Consularized
inventories just for Mexicans returning, no for foreign citizens.
For Foreign citizens we need that customer has the FM-3 (is the Migratory
Form)
And also One copy of your passport.

This is that I need from you only.

If you have any question, pls advise me



Kind regards


Margarita Fernández

She left off that you need a detailed list in Spanish and English

Ron
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#28 chris in cozumel

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 09:54 AM

That is what makes it so hard to do things here because everyone will tell you something different. As it stands now , I have to deposit in the bank account of a clearing agent in Progresso 5,000 peses and an additional $93 for the shipping company in order to have my goods released so that they can be sent to Cancun. This is the name on the account that I have to make my deposit in BERNARDO MANUEL MIER Y TERAN GUTIERREZ.
I will let you know what happens. I am sure that I will have to pay storage charges for the 2 months that it has sat there. It isn't possible to get bored here because everything is an adventure.
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#29 divadiver

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 05:20 PM

Chris,

It's good to hear there has been some progress in Progreso. :-0) I hope it doesn't cost you too much more money or grief.
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