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#41 MarkC

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:53 AM

Wanted to share a quote, which although is not 100% relevant, hit home:



"No aquarium, no tank in a marine land, however spacious it may be, can begin to duplicate the conditions of the sea. And no dolphin who inhabits one of those aquariums or one of those marine lands can be considered normal."

- Jacques Yves Cousteau




I think something similar can be said about horses.
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#42 morenita

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 10:14 AM

Funny that you mention the book by Stephens. I actually have a copy of sections and could lend it to anyone who would like to read it. In his book there is a drawing of a temple, which sadly does not exist today. Cortes wrote about Xamencab in the 1500's which was where San Miguel "el centro" is. At least this is what I have read. All history is subjective. Some of what has been written has been disputed by other historians. There are claims no Americans were involved in the construction. It is true the construction, by agreement, was to be done by Mexicans. According to other sources, American equipment and supervision was used. There are suggestions the president of Mexico was upset to find the U.S. building housing, because they were never to have residence here. This is all disputable. There are valid points to be made and historians will always debate the accuracies. Thank you for pointing out that these stories may just be myth. I love to search for the truth. I have heard from long time residents here that is is absolutely not true that the landing strip was only dirt. I was not there and could not say. There were mayan ruins even in San Miguel which were destroyed and the materials used in the construction of homes when the town was built. Drawings of ruins from Stephens book in the 1840's do not show up in Cozumel in the later 1800's. Cozumel from my recolection was mostly for pilgrimage and women seeking fertility. But someone will correct me if I am wrong about that. And if I am wrong about anything I have stated please correct me. It is not my interest in being right. I love history and allways willing to learrn something new. I edited my previous post to not cause controversy

Freezin Canuck, when did Liberia declare their independence? That is another fascinating history. Wasn't that mostly created by missionaries for fleeing slaves? Or am I mistaken about that?
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#43 CZMDM

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 12:22 PM

Even if there had been Mayan artifacts on the island in the distant past, the scourage of Cortez destroyed many Mayan sites. The knowledge of the Maya was destroyed by the Spanish, as ordered by the Catholic church. After the conquest, the Spanish Father Diego de Landa ordered all Mayan books gathered and burned in a huge bonfire in a town in the central Yucatan called Maní. (The town still exists and is a lovely, sleepy, small town.) Any Maya person caught with a book was tortured and killed.

Ironically Diego de Landa is responsible for both the destruction of the most important of Mayan documents and keeping a journal which has proved to be the most insightful description of the Mayan world known Western cultures. Odd that one of the men who hated the Maya the most would write one of the few books which accurately describes the Mayan world.

It is also my understanding from this book and a book titled "The Blood of King" that Cozumel was not really inhabited by the Maya, but rather like you stated Morenita was a place of pilgramage.
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#44 morenita

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 01:29 PM

I have not read The Blood of King, but now am going to have to see if I can find it.
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#45 CZMDM

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 02:35 PM

I am sorry. It is "The Blood of Kings" plural. It also describes some dream quest type rituals in which young Mayan men & women of royal blood were required to participate. Not for the squeamish.

One interesting thing in "Incidents of Travel...". is that it explains the high percentage of Mayan cross-eyed children during that period. The Maya believed that cross-eyes were the sign of deity. They would hang a pearl directly between the eyes of infants and after time the eyes would stay crossed. One of the team was an ophthalmologist. As they proceeded through the Yucan the surgeon would perform simple surgery on literally hundreds of Mayans to correct their vision.

The book is incredible. There are 3 main North Americans and numerous Mexicans aiding them along with Mayan guides. They were the first Westerners to see the ruins of Chichen-Itza, which was completely buried in vegetation. They all had malria and the book noted that at the end of the day when they would write in their journals that they sometimes had to compare notes to make sure that they were not reporting a phantom of a hallucination.
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#46 morenita

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 02:59 PM

Mike, I don't know about it being "a dry read". I found the book fascinating. There was a drawing of a rancho that was drawn by I believe another gentleman who had made attempts to buy the island. But again my memory is not pefect since it has been quite some time since I read it. But this was an excelllent book.
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#47 CZMDM

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 03:03 PM

I just meant that the writing syle of the mid-1800's moves along slightly slower than that of more contemporary writers. There are two volumes.
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#48 morenita

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 03:32 PM

Understood. But for the historical value it is excellent. I should clarify by copy, I have never had the pleasure of reading it in it's entirety. I have a very good friend who this is her study. She lives in Merida and teaches this subject. She has given me copies of sections of this book that pertain to Cozumel and a few other ruins in the Yucatan. It is fascinating. Stephens had a partner , don't know the name. but I understand he was the artist who did most of the drawings. They are amazing. Do you remember anything of some story in his book about something to do with Uxmal being built in a day? I will have to see if she has the entire book. Now I am really interested and would love to read it in its entirety. She can spend hours explaining the ruins of Chichenitza, Uxmal,Coba etc. From the significance to the number of steps, and the Mayan calender, Haab, and on and on. I love this stuff.
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#49 Coz2wonder

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 04:50 PM

I would like to make a suggestion, and that is a new topic be started regarding Cozumel.

I find the discussion of the utmost interest and does deserve it's own discussion and header.
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#50 morenita

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 05:03 PM

I agree this got off topic. My fault.

The original topic is an important one.
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#51 Coz2wonder

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 05:12 PM

If you open a new topic, I will attempt to move all relevant post to the new header.

We will have to wait and see what happens, or doesn't happen with the horses for now.
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