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Agave Nectar


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#1 bulsaros

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 09:54 PM

Hi, is it possible to buy Agave Nectar on the island if so where and at what price

Thanks David
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#2 mstevens

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 08:21 AM

I'm positive I've seen small squeezy bottles of agave nectar at Mega in the center section with the imported goods.

No idea about price. It's usually safe to assume it'll be noticeably more expensive than NOB. If you use a lot of it, that could conceivably make it worth bringing some from the States. Otherwise, the hassle and risk of getting everything in your check-through luggage all syrupy probably makes it worth whatever premium they charge.
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#3 mstevens

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 08:24 AM

It turns out that entering "agave nectar" in the friendly search box in the upper right of this screen will return a list of hits that includes this post from a little over a year ago that also mentioned Mega as a source, as well as the Lebanese coffee shop on Avenida Pedro Joaquin Coldwell (30).
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#4 henribos

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 12:01 PM

I've also seen it at the little coffee shop beside the car wash "Tunel" on 30th and 4th? But it was a while ago. Sorry no idea of the price.
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#5 Steve

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 07:38 PM

I know I have seen it. I believe it comes in cans. I was going to try some the other day but nectars are to thick for my liking.
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#6 lstaton

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 08:16 PM

They have it at Chedraui...it is with the pancake syrups...I believe it is $29.00 or $39.00 pesos
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#7 bulsaros

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 09:34 PM

In my humble opinion the best maragarita's are made with this, I would say this is a great alternative to simple syrup.
btw thanks for the replies I will have to get some when we are back in town, 27 DAYS TO GO :D
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#8 mstevens

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:56 AM

In my humble opinion the best maragarita's are made with this, I would say this is a great alternative to simple syrup.


Odd, since simple syrup or sugar have no place in a margarita to begin with.
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#9 morenita

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:14 AM

So true. A real Margarita only needs to have tequila, orange liquor and fresh lime juice. Who knows when they started adding the syrup?
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#10 cvchief

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 09:02 AM

Orange liquor? I thought that was just a La Choza thing?
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#11 mstevens

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 09:17 AM

So true. A real Margarita only needs to have tequila, orange liquor and fresh lime juice. Who knows when they started adding the syrup?


I've always preferred Controy for the orange liqueur - even Cointreau isn't quite right for me. Thus, I was pleased to learn recently that it is actually widely available in the US hidden in bottles labeled Patron Citronge. When they first started importing and relabeling it, it was actually in the classic square green Controy bottle with the same molded-in markings. They now bottle it in a bottle that matches other Patron products, but it's true Controy in there.

My theories on how syrup came to be used include:

1) Americans like sweet stuff. A lot.
2) Not that long ago, limes were pretty exotic in the US. People often disagree when I say this, but they're still very expensive in the Northeast (I recently paid USD$3 for 2 mediocre limes in an emergency!) and were not routinely stocked in bars. I was a bartender in college, and limes were only used in tiny slivers as flags, never squeezed.
3) Rose's Lime Juice. Ugh! This vile stuff was, and to a large extent often still is, used as if it were lime juice in bars and contains a lot of sugar. It's based, somewhat loosely, on the original Rose's Lime Cordial which is actually pretty tasty when diluted to make a limeade but very hard to find in the US. I've done a side-by-side tasting. The Cordial is fine and might even be a decent substitution in a dire emergency. The "Juice" just tastes cooked and bitter with no real lime taste at all.
4) "Sour Mix", also known as "Sweet and Sour Mix" and functionally indistinguishable from "Margarita Mix" incorporates theories 1 and 2 above and adds a huge dollop of laziness. Just throw some tequila and some Sour Mix in a shaker and hey, presto!: "margarita". Many bars leave out the orange liqueur altogether. Sour Mix is water, sugar, and chemicals.

Most Americans' idea of a Margarita is tequila in "mix", so they think of it as a sweet drink with sour notes and a vaguely detectable tequila-ish-ness.

Mexicans love them some limes but Americans tend not to know what to do with them. We know and are familiar with lemons, which can be unobtanium in Mexico. As more Americans are exposed to Mexican culture and foods they're starting to realize limes are a wonderful and indispensable fruit and not unripe lemons. My prediction is that as Americans come to want more lime in their margaritas their desire for sweetness will diminish to the point that the orange liqueur provides plenty. With luck, that might mean the demise of Sour Mix. One can hope.
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#12 cvchief

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 09:20 AM

Mstevens,

You have applications for an internship?

:P
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#13 mstevens

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 09:33 AM

Orange liquor? I thought that was just a La Choza thing?


Wow. I think my mind just officially boggled!

Orange liqueur has always been in the recipe for a margarita starting when it was esoteric and exotic in the US (where it may have started). A good place to find "real", well-researched, thoughtful drink recipes is drinkboy.com. Here's their recipe:

2 ounces tequila
1 1/3 ounce Cointreau
2/3 ounce lime juice

Shake with ice. Strain into a salt rimmed cocktail glass, or a salt rimmed, ice filled, margarita glass.


Note how prominent the orange liqueur is compared to the tequila. Also note that water is an unlisted ingredient since if this is not shaken with ice it won't taste right. In the absence of Controy in a typical US bar, I agree with his choice of Cointreau.

The Margarita is an official International Bartenders Association cocktail, and their official recipe is:

3.5 cl Tequila
2 cl Cointreau
1.5 cl Freshly squeezed lime juice
Pour all ingredients into shaker with ice.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass rimmed with salt

For those who still use Old Money measurements, a centiliter is 1/3 fluid ounce. 1 1/2 of them is a Tablespoon or 1/2 fluid ounce.

IBA calls a thing made with tequila, lime juice, and agave nectar a "Tommy's Margarita" and lists it among "New Era Drinks" while a Margarita counts as a "Contemporary Classic" along with things such as the Mojito, Mai Tai, and Mint Julep.
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#14 morenita

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 09:45 AM

I am with you on the Controy. It is the only thing I use for Margaritas. I have not had a good Margarita here in Cozumel. Most use jarabe or syrup and may eliminate the orange liquor or add other ingredients. I prefer to make my own with only Tequila, Controy and fresh squeezed lime juice. Just the right combination shaken with ice and you have the perfect Margarita.

I looked at the recipe on the back of my Controy bottle and it says 1 part Tequila, 3/4 parts Controy and 1/2 part lime juice. Which is slightly more Controy and lime juice than both recipes you listed. I actually mix mine in between the two, but closer to the mixture you use Doc.

Wow Doctor! Bartender, biologist, Doctor! Who knew? Pretty impressive resume!
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#15 bulsaros

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 09:56 AM

Wet Wendy's who some say serve the best margarita on the island use simple syrup hhmmmmmmmmmmmm
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#16 morenita

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 10:41 AM

I tried a Margarita at Wet Wendy's because a friend kept telling me how great they were. Was definitely not impressed. Way to sweet for my taste. Most all bars and restaurants add syrup.
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#17 cvchief

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:54 AM


Moretina,



I drive a car, I can't put the piston in an engine.





I drink a margarita, I don't make it.

(And sometimes I don't even walk so good after....):P






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#18 bulsaros

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:55 AM

at the end of the day it's down to your own preference as to how you like it, after all it all goes down the one way :D
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#19 morenita

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:37 PM

I am with you chief on the car and motor thing. I used to watch and help my cousin work on engines. But honestly I don't like it at all. I repair anything I can in my home but the car definitely goes to a mechanic. I could change my own oil or battery or headlight etc. But as long as I can afford to take to a mechanic why bother.

Yes it is all personal preference. I like the traditional Margarita with just the three ingredients. Definitely without syrup. Not a fan of the sweeter "new era drinks". But it's a matter of each persons taste.
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#20 MarkC

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 01:08 PM

Syrup in a margarita?

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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”




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