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Need Help With The Names Of These Flowers


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#1 sherrintxs

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 01:28 PM

While we were walking around downtown last week I snapped these pics. Can someone tell me the names of the flowers, please?

TIA

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#2 Carey

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 01:34 PM

first one is plumeria known locally as flora de maya. They make leis out of the blossoms in Hawaii. I think it is native to the Yucatan.
Second I don't know the name but it looks like you might have taken the shot of my front gate. They look like purple copa de oro's to me.
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#3 sherrintxs

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 03:24 PM

first one is plumeria known locally as flora de maya. They make leis out of the blossoms in Hawaii. I think it is native to the Yucatan.
Second I don't know the name but it looks like you might have taken the shot of my front gate. They look like purple copa de oro's to me.


Thank you, Carey, for your help. THere are so many beautiful flowers in Cozumel..glad I have the same climate here in south east Texas for them...now to find them here. lol
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#4 TRAVELER89

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 03:42 PM

The first one is a "Flor de Mayo", yes a Plumeria, but many epats call it flor de maya, the second I believe is one of the many species of hibiscus.......
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#5 DebB

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 08:36 PM

The second is what Carey has: Allamanda. Yellow allamanda is more common than purple here but there are lots of purple, too.

Plumerias are also called "frangipani."
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#6 sherrintxs

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:33 AM

The second is what Carey has: Allamanda. Yellow allamanda is more common than purple here but there are lots of purple, too.

Plumerias are also called "frangipani."


Thank you all for your help. I just found the yellow Allamanda at a place here locally in the Houston area...I remember seeing a lot of it last year when we stayed at Park Royal. After staying at Iberostar and walking around town and seeing all the beautiful flowers, I am ready to re-do my property! lol
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#7 Carey

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:51 AM

Thank you all for your help. I just found the yellow Allamanda at a place here locally in the Houston area...I remember seeing a lot of it last year when we stayed at Park Royal. After staying at Iberostar and walking around town and seeing all the beautiful flowers, I am ready to re-do my property! lol

Since your climate is similar -- although it gets colder in the winter, does it not? I was in Houston once on New Year's Eve and it was in the 50's and blowing hard and there was a hail storm the day I flew into Houston last week -- here are a couple of other plants that thrive here.

4 o'clocks -- they make great ground cover to keep out other weeds, have a lovely aroma and grow to 4 feet on occasion. This plant also did well in the piedmont of North Carolina
Hibiscus -- the red girls thrive the best here but others do well also. Gorgeous flowers
Oleander -- we have a pink flowered one that is 10 feet tall and never stops blooming.
bougainvillea -- needs almost no care to grow but a bugger to prune when full sized thanks to the hellish thorns
night blooming jasmine -- tiny white flowers and a divine fragrance. This plant also did well in the piedmont of North Carolina

Trees: Bird of paradise is one you could easily get in Texas and thrives here year round with no leaf drop here at least. Cayamito is our favorite tree but no sure you would be able to get it there. The leaves are gold on the under side and it grows in a lovely umbrella like shape with a little underneath pruning.

What have I left out, Cozumel gardeners??
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#8 J belle

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 01:20 PM

Since your climate is similar -- although it gets colder in the winter, does it not? I was in Houston once on New Year's Eve and it was in the 50's and blowing hard and there was a hail storm the day I flew into Houston last week -- here are a couple of other plants that thrive here.

4 o'clocks -- they make great ground cover to keep out other weeds, have a lovely aroma and grow to 4 feet on occasion. This plant also did well in the piedmont of North Carolina
Hibiscus -- the red girls thrive the best here but others do well also. Gorgeous flowers
Oleander -- we have a pink flowered one that is 10 feet tall and never stops blooming.
bougainvillea -- needs almost no care to grow but a bugger to prune when full sized thanks to the hellish thorns
night blooming jasmine -- tiny white flowers and a divine fragrance. This plant also did well in the piedmont of North Carolina

Trees: Bird of paradise is one you could easily get in Texas and thrives here year round with no leaf drop here at least. Cayamito is our favorite tree but no sure you would be able to get it there. The leaves are gold on the under side and it grows in a lovely umbrella like shape with a little underneath pruning.

What have I left out, Cozumel gardeners??


Carey can you recommend if any of these will flower in a mostly shade area? Seems like most flowering plants like sun, but I want to fill in a shady area. Thanks!
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#9 Carey

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 02:10 PM

Carey can you recommend if any of these will flower in a mostly shade area? Seems like most flowering plants like sun, but I want to fill in a shady area. Thanks!


coleus and caladium grow very well in shade. And don't forget orchids! 4 o'clocks like partial sun but if they like your soil, they'll grow in mostly shade, too, I would think. It's hard to say down here because the sun is so intensely bright and strong closer to the equator as we are that shade here can often give almost as much light as being in full sun in more northern climes. You're right that the others listed like partial sun and bougainvillea likes it hot, hot hot.
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#10 DebB

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 03:29 PM

Depends on whether your shade is dry or damp as to what you can grow. There are hardy palms -- esp. Sabal & Palmetto, the latter can grow in shade. Better yet, check out a TX-based nursey like Zone9Tropicals found via Dave's Garden, which is a good resource, too (davesgarden.com): http://www.zone9trop...f51f51090931a38
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#11 Carey

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:28 PM

Something you also have to keep in mind about gardening here as opposed to where you are in Texas -- I don't know about the soil there. But here it is limestone karst. You have to start plants in imported from the nursery or jungle dirt because, typically, the top soil will extend down 2" or often a lot less depending on how much leaf mulch, branches etc have decomposed in the area over the years. Kind of brutal in that way. We also have the salty air which isn't as much of a consideration 3 blocks or more back from the water. All the plants we've mentioned do well in the limestone soil and without the addition of something to neutralize the base.

It's also extremely hard to dig down into -- worse then mountain clay is my experience. So only certainly plants that can either have a very shallow root system like palms or plants with the strength to push their roots down through the karst will thrive in this environment without minding them every minute.
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#12 sherrintxs

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 07:25 PM

Today my husband and I went towards Houston and went to a local nursery and I bought a Plumeria tree. All they had were hot pink colored, but they are well established trees, so I went ahead and bought one. We have very sandy soil in my area, I am north of Houston. My husband is going to plant it tomorrow, the tree is all ready over 6ft. This weekend I am going to go somewhere else and see about another one and some allamanda.
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#13 Carey

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 06:12 AM

Today my husband and I went towards Houston and went to a local nursery and I bought a Plumeria tree. All they had were hot pink colored, but they are well established trees, so I went ahead and bought one. We have very sandy soil in my area, I am north of Houston. My husband is going to plant it tomorrow, the tree is all ready over 6ft. This weekend I am going to go somewhere else and see about another one and some allamanda.


I love the bright pink plumerias! But don't give up if your big tree doesn't flourish. Generally larger tree transplants don't do as well -- especially if they have been growing root bound in a pot or the roots had to be chopped to pull them up. Plumerias actually grow very well from cuttings that you just stick in the ground without much ado.

I got a couple cuttings with green, live ends in forked branches about 2 ft tall from a tree that was being pruned by a neighbor. Basically just stuck it upright in the limestone and staked it. 6 months later it is growing and I have a raft of blossoms. So if the big tree doesn't work, go for something small that is less likely to be root bound. Or try some cuttings off the tree you have -- after it has some months to get settled in. Do not over water. Just water for first few weeks. Plumeria does not typically need water when its growing well and looks healthy.
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#14 Kabanga

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 06:00 AM

I can just TELL that that dog has PERSONALITY What a lucky guy What I want to know is, is 'ponchis' like from the techno music imitation, 'ponchis ponchis ponchis?' hahahahahahahahaha Great story all around

-Tom
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