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Beware Of Peak Mosquito Hours


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#1 morenita

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 12:51 PM

THE DENGUE MOSQUITO BITES DURING THE DAY

It is a myth that mosquitos only bite in the morning and evening. Many falsely believe that it is dusk and dawn (sunrise and sunset). But the peak time is the hours between dusk and dawn. But the dengue mosquito is very active during the day.

This is from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Be aware of peak mosquito hours. The peak biting times for many mosquito species is dusk to dawn. However, Aedes aegypti mosquitos feeds during the daytime. Take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing during daytime as well as during the evening and early morning.

There has been alot of missinformation put forth. It is important to get the facts!

Dengue virus is primarily transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, particularly A. aegypti.[2] These mosquitoes usually live between the latitudes of 35° North and 35° South below an elevation of 1,000 metres (3,300 ft).[2] They bite primarily during the day

According to the CDC it is important to apply a repellent with DEET any time you are outside, not just morning and evening. And weather permitting wear protective clothing.
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#2 Coz2wonder

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 01:08 PM

Also, check for any standing water. Especially in flower pots that do not have drainage.

We went over to the east side once, and drove back the 4 wheel drive road, during the afternoon. I had NEVER encountered so many HUGE beasts in my life. They where horrible, and we had to turn around and run for our lives.

Mosquito are our enemy.
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#3 morenita

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 01:11 PM

Empty containers with standing water. But you also need to scrub them to dislodge the eggs. It is not enough just to empty the water. The eggs from the dengue mosquito can survive up to a year in a dry state. The virus is passed from the female to the egg. When the egg is re hydrated from rain they will hatch and after the larvae matures in a few days the dengue cycle will continue. So remove all standing water and scrub containers.

Just wanted to clarify this. It was said in another thread that the dengue mosquito mainly bites in the morning and evening (sunrise and sunset).

THIS IS FALSE!

I just wanted to clear this up in a new thread. So that there is absolutely no confusion. I figured it would get lost in the other thread.
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#4 MarkC

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 01:34 PM

Ask anyone thats been to Tulum during the middle of the day without any bug repellent... middle of the day can be pure hell
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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”

#5 morenita

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 01:38 PM

Or Holbox! I agree. I have been in Tulum during the middle of the day. And they were very thick. The mosquito that caries dengue feeds during the day. Be aware!

One of the worst places I have experienced mosquitos during the middle of the day was at the Belizean border.

The thing is the mosquito that carries dengue is smaller than some and less noticeable than some other larger species. They are very fast and quiet. They do not make the buzzing sound as some do,

But they most definitely bite during the day. In fact that is when they are more likely to bite you. Not at dusk or dawn. But stay protected all day long to be safe. Just because they primarily bite during the day does not make you immune at night or early morning.

Many species feed from dusk until dawn but will feed during the day in shady areas, indoors or on cloudy days. The dengue mosquito feeds during the day primarily (they like sunlight) but will also feed from dusk until dawn. And will feed in artificial light inside or outside.
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#6 mexcelia

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 03:09 PM

Have the trucks already sprayed? Was wondering if I blinked and missed them, the critters are horrible in the parks............
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#7 morenita

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 12:53 AM

Be safe and use a DEET repellent against the dengue mosquito anytime you are outside. And be careful the dengue mosquito will bite indoors in artificial light.


From the New England Journal Of Medicine


Our study shows that only products containing
DEET offer long-lasting protection after a single application.
Certain plant-derived repellents may provide
short-lived efficacy, which may be sufficient when
arthropod bites are primarily a nuisance. Frequent reapplication
of these repellents would partially compensate
for their short duration of action. However,
when one is traveling to an area with prevalent mosquito-
borne disease that could be transmitted through
a single bite, the use of non-DEET repellents would
seem to be ill-advised. Given our findings, we cannot
recommend the use of any currently available non-
DEET repellent to provide complete protection from
arthropod bites for any sustained outdoor activity.
Although this study shows that DEET-based products
can be depended on for long-lasting repellent
effect, they are not perfect repellents. DEET may be
washed off by perspiration or rain, and its efficacy
decreases dramatically with rising outdoor temperatures.

Despite the substantial attention paid by the lay
press every year to the safety of DEET, this repellent
has been subjected to more scientific and toxicologic
scrutiny than any other repellent substance. The extensive
accumulated toxicologic data on DEET have
been reviewed elsewhere.

DEET has a remarkable
safety profile after 40 years of use and nearly 8 billion
human applications.

Fewer than 50 cases of
serious toxic effects have been documented in the
medical literature since 1960, and three quarters of
them resolved without sequelae.

Many of these
cases of toxic effects involved long-term, heavy, frequent,
or whole-body application of DEET. No correlation
has been found between the concentration
of DEET used and the risk of toxic effects. As part
of the Reregistration Eligibility Decision on DEET,
released in 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency
reviewed the accumulated data on the toxicity of
DEET and concluded that “normal use of DEET
does not present a health concern to the general U.S.
population.”

When applied with common sense,
DEET-based repellents can be expected to provide a
safe as well as a long-lasting repellent effect. Until a
better repellent becomes available, DEET-based re-pellents
remain the gold standard of protection under
circumstances in which it is crucial to be protected
against arthropod bites that might transmit disease.


DEET is also recommended by the World Health Organization, the EPA and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention
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#8 MarkC

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 10:27 AM

Morenita, what about reef safe?

Remember, you've never seen a grouper with a mosquito bite

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
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#9 morenita

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 10:35 AM

Nor have I seen diving moquitos.
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#10 cvchief

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 10:48 AM

Well, I don't think the major air suppliers rent tanks that small....
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#11 MarkC

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 10:56 AM

they free dive!
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#12 Steve

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 07:47 PM

Maybe someone can enlighten me a little. I have been under the impression that mosquitos normally don't carry Denque unless the have been infected. Is that correct or wrong? If mosquitos don't normally carry the disease and mosquitos are fairly territorially, why should I be that concerned about a bite I receive in my yard? I should be more concerned in populated areas. How do the mosquitos become infected with the disease if they normally don't carry it? I know I have searched the subject before but don't remember getting any good answers.
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#13 cvchief

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 10:38 PM

I *think* you are right. The dengue mossie both doesn't do well in wind so it hides in houses and little hiding places AND it has to get infected to infect you. That is what I got out of reading. So I would think restaurants and such would places to be on guard besides your lodgings.

Those eastside SOBs will just drain you in three bites or carry you off.....
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#14 morenita

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 11:05 PM

You are correct that you are at more risk in heavier populated areas just because there is a higher chance that the mosquito will bite someone who is infected. The dengue mosquito gets the disease by biting someone who has the disease and then will pass it on to another person through their saliva when they bite them. The dengue mosquito can live for up to one month and can lay as many as 5 batches of eggs during that time. Each batch can be up to 200 eggs. The disease is transferred from the female to the eggs. So it can latter be transmitted through the offspring. The eggs can survive up to a year in a dried up state and will hatch after re hydrated by rain or some other way that water is introduced. These numbers are all from memory but am pretty sure fairly accurate. The range of the dengue mosquito is I believe up to a max. of 200 meters but again this is from memory. So if a mosquito is infected she can infect another person within a two block radius. And the off spring can each have another two block radius in any direction. I am assuming then each female from any of the potential eggs of each of those 1000 potential offspring will also pass it on through her offspring. But I am not 100% sure of that. I would have to consult my friend who is an entomologist. What I am saying is that I believe an infected female can pass the disease through her eggs. When those hatch and mature the females from that batch I assume can pass it on again through any eggs she lays. And on and on. This is how it gets spread and the range can continue to increase. From one infected female the range can increase up to 12 blocks within a month if she lives that long and lays up to 5 batches of eggs. A female can lay up to 1000 eggs during her lifespan and any female from those potential 1000 eggs can potentially lay up to another 1000 eggs. The disease can stay dormant in the eggs up to a year, so transmission increases exponentially with each mosquito that is infected. If anyone has any different information feel free to correct me. All this is from memory.

Lets say we cut all those numbers in half. Lets say an infected female lives for two week and lays two batches of eggs of 100. Lets say half of those are females. That would be 100 and lets say each of those lays an additional 200 eggs and of those half are female which would be 100 each. That would be 100,000 dengue transmitting mosquitoes in a little over a month from one infected female with more conservative numbers of half of the max potential.

But if a female lived her maximum life and had availability of a rich blood supply and laid her maximum potential of eggs and all survived and the same thing happened which each female. Then one female could produce an maximum of 250,000 females which could carry the disease, with a ratio of 1:1 male to female. But if you factor in even a 1% reproduction and survival rate one female could produce over 2000 offspring, and consecutive offspring, in her lifetime capable of spreading the disease. And each of those 2000 the same.

Of course all these numbers are the maximums and would be way way over inflated, and understanding statistics could never happen. Obviously not all females will live for a month and will not lay 5 batches and not all of those batches will be 200 eggs ( depending on amount of blood ) and not all those will survive and of the ones that do not all will be females. And the one month figure would be longer when you add in incubation periods, I believe one to two weeks, and depending on how long each batch of eggs stay dormant before hatching. But it is possible that from one infected female it can spread over twelve blocks within a short time. And one female could lay up to a maximum of 1000 eggs during that time, and each surviving female from those potential 1000 eggs would continue to spread it through her offspring of a potential 1000 eggs. This is why it is almost impossible to eradicate. It has been done in some places. But it takes a huge commitment of resources. I read somewhere that when China was looking at a program to eradicate mosquito transmitted disease it would require, if my memory serves me correct, up to 50% of their entire health services budget. Something which is impossible for most countries. But dengue and malaria had been all but eradicated in some parts of the world. But later to make a comeback in others.

Eradication efforts like spraying of pesticides do very little to control the mosquito population. It will only kill the mosquitoes that are in sight at the time and that come in contact with the pesticide. Studies have shown that in some cases spraying actually increases the mosquito population because it indiscriminately kills other beneficial insects. Same with bug lights and "zappers". Studies have shown that homes with bug lights have more mosquitoes than homes without. They draw more insects to the area. Kill more beneficial insects and leave more mosquitoes to feed. Ultrasonic devices do not work. In studies mosquitoes will actually land on the devices and probe them. They are supposed to simulate the sound of dragonfly or bat wings or other insects that feed on mosquitoes. They do not work. The others that are supposed to emit a sound which drives the mosquitoes away do not work either. But it's your money. The only repellent that has been proven to provide long term protection are products containing DEET. As has been discussed before there are natural oils that repel mosquitoes. But at the concentrations that work they are toxic. So when they are diluted to levels that are safe they only provide short term protection requiring the user to reapply every 10 to 20 minutes depending on the product. DEET is the safest and most effective product.

Interestingly perhaps the best chance of significantly reducing the disease may be introducing more dengue mosquitoes. Genetically altered mosquitoes. The method has had some real promise in areas with high percentages of malaria. But the biggest drawback is there are some who refuse to trust science and research. The biggest obstacle is a skeptical public. Some will never trust in the best research and development available. There will always be doubters. Some people refuse to believe in global warming which has been a real contributing factor in the spread of mosquito born illnesses.
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#15 teacher

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 10:48 AM

So how would genetically altered mosquitos work to reduce Dengue?
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#16 morenita

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 01:34 PM

I am pretty sure it would be because they would be sterile and the female would not lay eggs so the disease slowly goes away with each cycle. That would be my educated guess. But I would have to confirm that. This method has allready been in use in other parts of the world with the malaria carrying mosquito with success.
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#17 cvchief

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 01:54 PM

I am pretty sure it would be because they would be sterile and the female would not lay eggs so the disease slowly goes away with each cycle. That would be my educated guess. But I would have to confirm that. This method has allready been in use in other parts of the world with the malaria carrying mosquito with success.


It would appear to be males shooting blanks. Here is an article from the Keys.
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#18 morenita

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 02:18 PM

DEET does not actually kill mosquitoes, it is not a pesticide, but repels them by confusing them. Some of the largest mosquitoes which some have talked about here apart from being a nuisance are actually very beneficial because they feed on the larvae of the dengue transmitting mosquito. Thanks for the link Chief on the GA mosquito. I was going to comment on the Dragonfly but could not remember the name in english and in spanish no one would know what I was talking about or the mayan name turich. These guys are killing machines in the larvae state and later as adults. They can eat up to their own weight in a half an hour. That would be like if I could sit down to the table and eat 100 lbs of tacos in 30 minutes. That's impressive. They also have a special form of jet propulsion which might be to graphic to go into. Nothing can escape their prowess. The downside they can devastate bee colonies. But they are incredible mosquito killers. I still think the GA mosquitoes hold great promise. We should not be using pesticides to kill many beneficial insects, And some species of the over 3000, mosquitoes and also beneficial. But the GA mosquitoes would target the specific species of mosquitoes that transmit disease. But there will be those who will always be science deniers. Refusing to accept he best research and development available. Evidenced in the comments section of the link you posted to. Amazing! As stated before many still refuse to use DEET the best product on the market due to some unfounded fear. It is the safest and most effective product on the market for repelling mosquitoes. Others still deny global warming.

An update: I just read that the average female will lay from 1000 to 3000 eggs in her lifespan. So if you interupt just one female with a sterile male you start reducing the spread. And they do have a longer range than was was previously thought. Can be as far as 250 meters and possibly more. So if each female offspring from those 3000 surviving eggs can lay the same amount of eggs and they can survive a year or more in the dry state and travel up to three blocks or so, you can see how you would be at risk if bitten in your own backyard.
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#19 teacher

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 02:56 PM

What are the indications of global warming?
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#20 morenita

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 03:02 PM

Don't understand the question? Are you asking how it affects the spread of these types of diseases or the facts that it is real? Indication means a sign so I do not really understanding what you are asking?

The indication, or sign, of global warming is that the globe is "warming". Simply put heat is the indication of global warming. Rising temperature of the Earth. But I assume you meant to phrase your question differently?
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