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What It Means To Be "Picked Up"


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#1 mexcelia

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 07:32 AM

I will be taking a short break, but thought I'd put this out there first.........hope you enjoy

:rolleyes:

http://mexcelia.word...o-be-picked-up/
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#2 crunch

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:08 PM

I am a very practical gal. I would give them what they want now, bank the money in savings for untold emergencies yet to happen and not even thought of by you yet, and then next one do what you want and don't compromise.

Of course i like the title to give me an indication and i hate super short chapters..... :D
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#3 mexcelia

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:11 PM

someone private messaged me with basically the same suggestion............probably something to think about.....thanks!! B)
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#4 Coz2wonder

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 02:41 PM

Congradulations...I think you should be most proud of yourself. It is extremely difficult to get recognized by a publisher.

Think about what they are suggesting, and determine if you can live with it. Compromise may be a good thing in this case.
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#5 mexcelia

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:01 PM

thanks Coz, nice of you to say, and, since compromise seems to be the word of the day, looking at things a bit differently.......... B)
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#6 cvchief

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:21 PM

Well, if you were a carpenter and your store told you all anyone was buying were kitchen tables, you wouldn't spend your time building magazine racks. If your kitchen tables do very well, them maybe you can make a couple magazine racks and someone might actually buy them because you made them and they match the tables.

On the other hand if you aren't looking to sell them, make a bunch of magazine racks for your friends at Christmas. They can re-gift them if they don't want them.....

:P
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#7 mexcelia

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:44 PM

Thanks for the perspective Jefe, too funny :lol:
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#8 Ron

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 11:39 AM

That is a tough call. My niece is a free lance writer for all kinds of magazines, she faces these choices over and over. In my humble opinion give them what they want. It is a sad truth of life but to get anywhere you have to sometimes compromise. and even then there are no guarantees, but it is all up to the individual. My niece told me of one publisher that was just so unreasonable she walked away rather then dealing with him. Years later she by pure accident reluctantly wound up writing for his publication, which reminds me I never asked her how that worked out
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#9 mexcelia

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 12:37 PM

I wonder if he, the publisher, might have softened over the years as well? And, yes, it does seem to be a tough call. I just wish I wasn't so stubborn, but real life might be changing my ideals, or at the very least, a few of my goals. :)
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#10 artgirl

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 04:42 PM

Congratulations!!! I am an artist and art teacher and a "wanna-be" children's book author. When I began checking-in to what it would take to get a book published, I put the idea on the the back burner until retirement, just can't juggle that time-wise while teaching in the public school system. You should really be commended for having a forthcoming publishing committment on your novel, that is VERY exciting!! I don't have much to offer as far as advice on compromise except to say, it is a sliding scale for artists who want rights over their vision and expressions. If money weren't an issue (which it hardly ever is not when you are in the arts) I'd say, hold-out for another publisher, BUT.... then again, it is your first novel, and they might have some very good feedback for making your book more successful without asking for too many essential creative changes. I wish you peace with your decisions. Keep us posted on when it's released!
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#11 mexcelia

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 05:10 PM

Thanks Artgirl, very nice words............and, I understand why you'd want to wait until you had more time, it is an all consuming process.......I really think there are only 2 reasons I was noticed fairly quickly - a couple of short stories published in the past, and I have a few friends in the business......and, yet it is still a daunting task since I'm continuing to look into other options...(I basically live on the computer these days)....but, thanks for the good thoughts :P
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#12 mexcelia

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 05:19 PM

Artgirl, Wanted to mention how great it is to hear that the public school system you are with offers art classes to their students!! And kudos to you for teaching them!
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#13 Charles

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 09:22 PM

I went to high school with a girl whose father was an established professional novelist. Although English was a second language he learned after leaving Hungary after the war with the Soviet Union, his English and its grammar was almost perfect (superior to most American college graduates). He asked us the study the opening page of his final first draft of his manuscript. We found one typo one word we weren't certain of its correctness. He then handed us the same page returned from the publisher and it was covered in red ink, corrections and changes to be made! It was a demonstration to us in the eight grade of what professional writing entailed. That was perhaps his sixth novel, all written in English, but translated into other languages for the European markets.

I have been a minor participant and observer to three years of annual Writers Symposiums organized by my director. It has brought quite a number of published authors, from NY Times Best Seller list to a "serial pulp fiction" writer was has 20 plus books based around the same characters. The whole purpose is to bring together, struggling, budding and aspiring writers to interact, network and pass on inspiration to those wishing to publish. Now with Kindle and assorted "ebooks", we're on the frontier of a whole new era in literature.

My suggestion would be a heavy serving of humble pie, swallowed by some pride and revel in the accomplishment. Can you imagine the number of great new novels that have been a work in progress for twenty plus years and once completed are never published? Make the changes and give 'em what they want. I have sat through discussions of titles and how they can make or break the success.

I don't know art, but I know what I like. The publishers know what sells. Imagine how much gets edited out of movies by the final cut, great scenes and cameo appearance fall to the cutting room floor. Current DVDs often include segments omitted from the final release.
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#14 mexcelia

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 07:39 AM

Charles,

First thing I want to say is "thank you." Maybe being a teacher for so many years has caused me to believe that I know of what I speak? But, although creative writing is not new for me, having to take suggestions pertaining to my own writing is, and a healthy serving of humble pie just might be what I need.

I've long told my students that our words are like our children, and, sometimes, we have to let them go. Maybe it is time I listened to my own advice. This particular work is very personal, but, then again, aren't they all? Looks like I have some editing to do.........
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#15 liverbird

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 08:03 AM

Mexcelia, congratulations on being "picked up", even though it may feel more like you have been "picked on". I think everyone who has written even just an article for the local paper has gone through a version of what you have been hit with. When you work hard on something, and particularly when it is deeply personal, of course you think it's perfect - that's why you wrote it that way?

However, as a professional translator and editor, I've seen that most things need a bit of massaging - things not written by me, of course!

Can you compromise a little? As long as they don't try and change your writing style, they know the market better than we do and are offering real-world advice. You have a gorgeous, fluid, musical way of expressing yourself so you should be fine adding bits here and there. Fight for the bits you really can't change, for personal,emotional or other reasons. The rest you'll have no problem tweaking. You are certainly good enough!
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#16 mexcelia

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 08:11 AM

Thank you Liverbird, very kind words indeed. I did try out the title with a friend yesterday who said, "I have no frame of reference for that," which was the final confirmation I needed for that suggestion. And, as you and others have pointed out, change can be good. But, and I'm sure that you know this considering your profession, the words can be quite personal and dear, to the writer anyway. I want to thank you, and all the other folks who were good enough to offer suggestions and support. We have a great community here, don't we? Next book will have to be about Cozumel, but few will believe it............ B)
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#17 Charles

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 09:12 AM

Next book will have to be about Cozumel, but few will believe it............ B)


If I wrote a book about Cozumel.....#1. It would probably get me deported from Mexico, certainly get me banned from the island and....#2. I probably have to undergo a complete make over and enter the U.S. Witness Protection Program!

I think it would be believed because no one would think anyone had the imagination to make it up! I lived for awhile on a quiet cul-de-sac in el centro. The cable TV often went out. We could always open our front curtains and watch the movie unfolding in front of our house. Our front picture window could often function as the island's first wide screen TV or private movie theatre.
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#18 Coz2wonder

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 03:03 PM

I would prefer something positive about Cozumel, somebody who loves the island, lives here and are able to talk about Cozumel currently...warts and all.

I also prefer success...those who made it through their transition, and adapted to a new culture and life.

It is difficult, it is different. It is what you make it.
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#19 mexcelia

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 03:40 PM

Not to worry Coz, my book would definitely be positive, cannot think of another way of being. The beauty, activities, events, and attitudes have always been encouraging, for me............. :D
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#20 DanB

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 06:35 AM

I mentioned your situation to a friend the other day who is a publisher and editor for a monthly news/culture magazine here in Ann Arbor. He also has written a couple books and went thru the process of getting them published. His comment was that if you are confident that you and your publisher share a common vision for your work, you can deal with changes, even lots of them. However if you wrote a serious historical novel about the civil war and the publisher wants to turn your book into a graphic romance novel - probably not a good fit. I'm more familiar with this same process in the music industry. Musicians have a certain vision about their music but to become something more than a local bar band and maybe a couple summer music festivals they need to connect with a promoter and label. The conflicts that go on when the promoter suggests certain changes to the music can be quite entertaining to watch. Walking the line between confidence in your art and arrogance can be complex. I hope your publisher is able to assure you that he/she shares the basic vision for your work and that this situation is the first of many for you.
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