Jump to content


Photo

My Saturday Morning Not So Excellent Adventure


  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#21 crunch

crunch

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 626 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas for now
  • Interests:Snorkeling, dogs, margaritas, beaches, reading, working out, chilling.

Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:27 PM

I am glad you are ok.

Any idea what is driving the general change in the youth?

I know change is inevitable, but that does not make it any less sad.
  • 0

#22 mstevens

mstevens

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 852 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Hampshire and Cozumel
  • Interests:Diving, Ducatis, Dorkdom

Posted 12 February 2013 - 02:37 PM

Any idea what is driving the general change in the youth?


The economy, plain and simple.
  • 0

#23 pato52

pato52

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 771 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

Here is the latest from our Blog. The Neighborhood watch is making an impression on the island press at least:

The Neighborhood Crime Watch program on Cozumel was started mainly by US ex-pats concerned about the growing number of burglaries and robberies on the island. While there have been no reports on whether or not any improvement has occurred in nefarious activities since the Watch started, the island press has taken notice of the program. Their take is that Cozumeleños should be ashamed that a group of non-Mexicans are attempting to make the island more secure while the locals seem to be taking crime as just a matter of course. The article notes that because the Cozumel Cops are so understaffed and under trained it is going to be up to all the citizenry to band together and support each other or else thefts will continue.
  • 0

#24 morenita

morenita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 409 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:14 PM

Charles you made a very good point. While the city is broke many suffer and police are not being paid to protect us public officials turn their backs. But what the hell we have CARNIVAL! YEA! Give them a parade and a party and they will forget the rest. They can't pay for police resources to keep us safe but they can dump money into a celebration, "a media circus of everyone celebrating", so for awhile the rest does not matter. There is a growing population who will not participate in Carnival because we see it for what it really is. Another festival to cover up the real problems. Once a year they host a big party in "Las Fincas". Same thing. AL PUEBLO PAN Y CIRCO. But some religious and community leaders are becoming more and more vocal in opposition to these tactics. I could go on about how keeping people uneducated extends their time for staying in power. As a Mexican I am not opposed to the traditions and the festivities. But I do not want to see so much money spent on this when many go without basic necessities for living. I know I am opening myself once again to criticism. But one might want to consider instead of bringing beads, candy, masks etc to pass out, that alternatively you could donate to Red Cross or basic medical necessities of the poorer amongst us. You will not see many of the most poor in Cozumel at these festivities. My friends from "las fincas" do not go. They can't afford it. We give out toothpaste and toothbrushes and soap in our church to distribute.
  • 0

#25 Steve

Steve

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,167 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 12 February 2013 - 10:12 PM

I just arrived and don't know much of anything but do hear the local gossip about what is going on. I was told that there was a robbery not to long ago with some people on the beach. Three of the people were in the water swimming while one remained behind to watch their stuff. While the people were in the water the one left behind was robbed by a few people with knives. The ones on the water saw this happening and happened to have a camera with them and got photos. The police were called and the thieves were caught within a day or so. The victim was called down to the station to identify the people and they were all beat up. The police asked the victim if he would like to add a few punches to them as there was nothing they could do because he was under age.

Many of the crimes here are caused by under age kids and the police have their hands tied as to what can be done about them. They are at least trying to show the kids that this is the wrong way to go. I will guarantee you that the police know which kids are causing the problems and they are just waiting for them to turn of age. They are not that stupid down here. I also heard that the neighborhood watch program is helping. The police are making more rounds. I am way back here in the hood and you are lucky to see a police vehicle come down our block once or twice a month. I have seen them come by at least 3 times today and once yesterday as I didn't arrive till later in the afternoon.

As for safety down town, I have never had a problem and have been down two nights in a row and feel perfectly fine.

Give the police a chance. They are trying.

The kids mentality down here is if you have two salt shakers sitting on your table, you don't need both of them so I am going to take one.
  • 0

#26 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:53 AM

The economy, plain and simple.


Huh? Well if you consider the price of crack, it is difficult to support a habit depending on a salaried job unless you are upper echelon politicians. Cozumel has long suffered from worst aspects of Americanization and what could be more American than substance abuse? Given the increasing pressure on traditional values, the often lack of extended family support available, the high rate of alcoholism makes for often single parent homes or dysfunctional homes where children are raised with neglect or ever growing abusive home situations. Too many children grow up lacking adult role models and gang mentality can fill voids of family, social interaction as well as offer protection from the abuse in home life and protection from other misfits.

Money or lack of in the household, doesn't necessarily play any role in the development and behaviour of the children. Our one living situation on the island, where we were strikingly the poorest household on the block (except Hazel), we were surrounded by monied Mexican families, several were downtown business owners and their children were rotten. Absolutely spoiled rotten, selfish, self centered brats and I can't fault the kids, they were victims of bad genes. If Mexico had the U.S. style "no questions asked" I would have dropped the kids off at a fire station or hospital. I don't believe in corporal punishment, but if ever there were tempting targets....and the parents deserved double whatever was dished out to the kids. The parents thought they had perfect little angels, little prince and princesses. They'd vandalise property, throw garbage in the street, have zero respect for the neighbours, they were demon possessed monsters when the parents weren't around (most of the time). Even when the parents were watching, they found it amusing that the kids would throw rocks at dogs and cats, torture lizards and bounce balls off the walls of other houses (yelled at if they did that against their house). I'm sure the parents would have been in shock and complete denial if they saw the 11-12 year old girls drop empty condom packs in our bushes and the 13-15 year old brothers who stashed their liquor stolen from home in the bushes of the vacant house at the end of the street. These were high "class" people that may have had money (more than we could ever fantasize having), but these people were void of class. The one "middle class, working family", the man in law enforcement and the mom a registered nurse, their two boys were the epitome of beautiful, well mannered kids that would have made any parent proud.

Morenita, Not bring down beads, candy and toys for the kids? Oh I just love the condescending North Americans (includes a few Canadians too) that are always thinking of the poor on the island. They always bring gifts for the maids, "I have heard from locals that they love chocolate" (Mexico that invented chocolate long before Spain was ruled by the Moors), "sample bottles of perfume and the mini hotel soaps, shampoos and skin lotions are popular" and for a special personal gift for a hotel maid, "a little basket of candles with bath salts and bath oils as what woman would not enjoy a relaxing bath" after a hard 14 hour day at work. Sundays nights downtown are one of the things just not to be missed in Cozumel! It is wonderful that the island has a party for all the poor people too! I love how the kids are so well groomed and dressed. It is always the high point of my trip to see the smiles when I hand out candy, glow sticks and stuff to the kids. I am just so amazed by the Sunday night crowds, how hard they work for so little money, but they can still get dressed up in the best clothes, shoes shined, so well groomed and they get one night to celebrate life! I read and translated posts like this to a lady that works as a maid and she laughed so hard, I thought she might wet her pants!

I think it is wonderful that people organise Santa Claus and give out gifts to the poor kids at Christmas! Never mind waiting for Three Kings Day. Somethings that you have a cultural superiority, it is a duty and a responsibility to change. Just as replacing Day of the Dead with Halloween. You can even find the Easter Bunny and Easter egg hunts. There's lots of good holidays for giving candy, toy gifts and other trinkets, with Hallmark Cards for every holiday. All this giving to "poor kids", is it like cultural missionaries, bringing light to those suffering in materialism darkness? Or is it another form of cultural imperialism that corrupts the traditional customs and instills in kids starved for materialism, that gringos are suckers and a good source, ready for the taking. You could bring food and feed a child, but they'll only get hungry again. Bring a starving kid a video game and that will take his mind off the hunger for days, weeks, as long as the batteries last.


What is happening in Cozumel today is the outcome of years worth or neglect, exploitation, poor planning, political paybacks, downtown and urban decay, combined with a construction boom funded by proceeds from money laundering drug money, you toss in a drug war that is approaching the end of its first decade, what do you have? Paradise with some tarnish. The diving is still good though, though it is no longer a scuba fueled economy. It could be a lot worse, you could be in Playa.

Batter Up!
  • 0

#27 mstevens

mstevens

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 852 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Hampshire and Cozumel
  • Interests:Diving, Ducatis, Dorkdom

Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:28 AM

What is happening in Cozumel today is the outcome of years worth or neglect, exploitation, poor planning, political paybacks, downtown and urban decay, combined with a construction boom funded by proceeds from money laundering drug money


How is that not "the economy"?
  • 0

#28 DebB

DebB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 449 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cozumel, MX

Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:34 AM

So, what to do if we want to continue riding our bikes and walking around while keeping our dear possessions? Here are a few ideas:

1. As Valli is doing, use an anti-theft cover for your bicycle basket(s). Bungie cargo nets and mesh hoods are commercially available in some parts of the world but a few bungies strapped across the top, a cover fashioned from an old t-shirt or some oilcloth, or a newspaper cover will work, too.

2. Carry handbags on your side away from traffic.

3. Do not text or listen to a music player when walking or cycling in public. These items attract thieves and distract you from what is going on around you.

4. Whenever possible, walk opposite the flow of traffic so that you face drivers.

5. Look at everyone's face. When you hear motos approaching from behind, slow down or stop, turn around, and look at them. I know this is a lot to ask, especially on a busy street!

6. Choose highest traffic routes at all times. At night -- and this is a big problem -- choose routes with best lighting and light yourself up, too. Here, street lighting includes vehicle headlights...

7. Do not have a visible routine. If you run the same errand at the same time every day or every week, try to break it up a bit to confuse those who know about it. Cozumel is a very small place!

Any other suggestions?
  • 0

#29 MarkC

MarkC

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 843 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:DFW

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:50 PM

How about walking against traffic?
  • 0
“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”

#30 crunch

crunch

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 626 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas for now
  • Interests:Snorkeling, dogs, margaritas, beaches, reading, working out, chilling.

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:20 PM

Charles - you are fairly cynical and condescending. Not that I don't enjoy that, but I think many people who do that stuff have very good intentions and should be gently re-directed if possible to give money where it can really help.

The majority do not do it to feel superior or in a condescending way I am pretty sure, but truly want to help in a more personal way than giving money. They do not deserve your scorn. At least they are trying to help.

I prefer to give money just because I am not comfortable doing that other stuff, but to each their own.

Morenito - I thought you made a really good point.
  • 0

#31 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 13 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

Charles - you are fairly cynical and condescending. Not that I don't enjoy that, but I think many people who do that stuff have very good intentions and should be gently re-directed if possible to give money where it can really help.

The majority do not do it to feel superior or in a condescending way I am pretty sure, but truly want to help in a more personal way than giving money. They do not deserve your scorn. At least they are trying to help.

I prefer to give money just because I am not comfortable doing that other stuff, but to each their own.

Morenito - I thought you made a really good point.


I have plenty of reasons to be cynical and I add that touch to balance the rose coloured glasses. I'm sure their intentions might be good, but you know the pavement of the highway to hell.

One strong Cozumel hospitality tradition is to never show reaction regarding behaviour that offends. Men can walk around in public with their shirts off, women wearing little more than that too. Handing out gifts to the cute "poor kids on the square", when many might have family net worth far greater is a joke. Certainly not all, but Americans as a whole are not good ambassadors of good will among other nations and cultures. I guess it is hard to be humble when they come from the greatest country ever or will ever be!

Do you think anyone that is grossly condescending has a clue how offensive they might be perceived? Collectively they remind me of the kind "white folks down south" that supported improved conditions for the Negro, many whom they knew personally and considered them to be "credits to their race". If the book "The Ugly American" was rewritten today, it wouldn't be about the CIA.

Twenty years ago you could easily divide the expat community into two parts. One that embraced the culture and the language and involved themselves and integrated their lives into the community. The other were those who might have had money, but not sufficient "blue blood" to be accepted in their world of high society. Like a neighbour, "I bought a house here, when are these damned Mexicans going to learn decent English"? The cruise ships being the dominating tourism doesn't help the situation.

Sorry crunc h, I feel too many are well beyond any gentle re-directing. If you can manage that, you have my appreciation.
  • 0

#32 morenita

morenita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 409 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 13 February 2013 - 04:31 PM

I understand Charles "subtlty" and I could never make the case the way he did in english. I understand some may be sensitive to his approach. But in my mind it was a masterpiece. It is not my intent to insult anyone. But I would suggest that the reason some pass out gifts and candy is to feel better about themselves. The response they get is more for their ego than the benefit to the children. I really do not mean that as an insult. Just something to consider. I know americans that go to great extent to bring all these items. I imagine what a difference they could make if the same energy and creativity were extended to bringing more beneficial things to the community. I knew of a couple who brought designer towels, soap dish, cup holder, toothbrush holder, toilet paper holder, robe hook, toilet seat, shower curtain, towel holder, bath mat, shelves for shower for soap and shampoo, shower head, etc to benefit a "poor" family who did not even have a bathroom with running water. Good intentions but of little use. A locally purchased pump and tinaco would have been a better investment. I am just saying the help should fit the beneficiary and comensurate (I think that is the right word) with the need. I am just saying if you want to help do some checking and give what the people need the most. Hint: it is not candy and beads. Even if it makes you feel good and brings a brief smile to a child.

You will be remembered more for giving medicine to a sick child than all the candy and beads in the world. One provides a brief smile. The other you will be remembered for a lifetime.

Charles you made so many good points I do not know where to start. It is painful for me to watch children in school who are hungry. It is very difficult to learn when they are thinking about their next meal. And I am not exagerating here. Your example about the video game is so true. That is why the govt does things to distract the masses from their situation. AL PUEBLO PAN Y CIRCO

And Crunc h giving the way you do is excellent. I remember reading that in the US after the last hurricane people were donating to the Red Cross things they could not even use. And actually cost them more to clean sort and package for distruibution than if they just bought the items with donations.

And relief items or anything to benefit a community are better if purchased as close to as possible if not directly in the community. What I mean is if you purchase these items in the US and bring them here you are not really benefiting anyone. It is best (if you insist on passing out gifts and candy ) that you purchase them here which benefits the community at least. And preferably in the smallest shops you can find not Sams, Mega etc.

I am sure my comments will get alot of criticsm. But it is not my intent to insult anyone just to get people to think.

Charles I love Sunday night in the park. It is with out all the commercialsm. The band a contribution by the city but worth it. Just good music and dancing. And small street vendors and Church bake sales.

"a little basket of candles with bath salts and bath oils as what woman would not enjoy a relaxing bath after a hard 14 hour day at work" PRICELESS.
  • 1

#33 Valli

Valli

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 569 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Winnipeg, Canada
  • Interests:Travel, cooking, bike riding,

Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:21 PM

I don't want to hijack my own thread, but I am with Charles and Morenita on this one. Charles really tells it like it is, and he has lived in different areas in town over the years and has an excellent understanding and perception of the realities. I have been coming to the island for about 18 years and of late, have been staying for longer periods of time. I don't consider myself a typical tourist at this point - but I realize learning is continuous and I still have much to discover. I did attend a group last year with the thought of volunteering - unfortunately it was more of an ego trip for some, a chance to be recognized, and I felt while some hearts may have been in the right place - the attitudes were patronizing and condescending and made me very uncomfortable. I will never claim to know what is best and right for the people here. But intellectually, I know education, having enough food to eat, clean clothes, proper medical care, school supplies, etc., can all be positive contributions for a better life and increased opportunities for the future. As such, I make cash donations to organizations that I know reflect these values and will use the money appropriately.

I attended the final parade of Carnival last night, and I can't recall ever seeing so many people. My joy is watching the kids and their excitement. I saw many families that brought stools and coolers of drinks and snacks with them, and just enjoyed seeing what a great time they were having. But I also imagine many families/kids did not attend, as they may not even be able to afford the bus fare to get to the venue.

Deb, thank you for posting the useful and practical tips for biking/walking. Once again, I am adapting and changing to hopefully decreasing my chances of another incident.
  • 0


Valli

#34 morenita

morenita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 409 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:36 PM

Valli I agree with you. I also love seeing all the people enjoying themselves at Carnival and how so many make it a family event. I just point out something to think about. You are so right about what you say. There is a very good group of volunteers who provide aid to local school children. And that is a very good group. I do not remember the spelling in English. In spanish it is crisalida. But you are also correct with many organizations it is more about egos. Again both you and Charles say it much better than I could.

Think about all the children that could really use a smile on their faces and their parents can't afford the bus for the whole family much less a taxi to go down to see the festivities. I know an albanil that took the whole family down to Carnival last year on his tricycle and someone stole his tricycle. The trip was not worth the small ammount of candy for the kids. It was so sad. I felt so bad. The point is that even a taxi or bus is more than some can afford and he took the risk to take his family for the final night. For many it is a big deal to go to something most of us take for granted.
  • 0

#35 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 14 February 2013 - 05:30 AM

There is a very good group of volunteers who provide aid to local school children. And that is a very good group. I do not remember the spelling in English. In spanish it is crisalida.


Thank you Morenita, That would be Chrysalis: http://www.cozumelchrysalisgroup.org/ More than just helping with the school expenses, the philosophy behind Chrysalis helps to build self esteem, confidence and the feeling that they are worthy and they can do it! From the beginning, the defining philosophy was that there were no poor people in Cozumel, there were low income families that could not bear the financial burden of gaining an education. Talk about efforts to reduce crime and juvenile delinquency! I feel so fortunate and privileged to have seen many of their kids blossom and fulfill their potentials.

The kids were so darling in the beginning, quiet and shy. Part of the whole process was for them to be accustomed to taking the initiative and grow into confident and self motivating young adults. The first time kids coming inside and doing it themselves: adult free zone, mothers,parents, please remain outside, your assistance shouldn't be needed. The parents were informed of just when the kids needed to return. After a couple of years, you could see the change and their confidence level grow. It was the one thing, the first thing they did on their own without assistance of their parents. It instilled responsibility and self reliance. Then the difference when they reached high school age, their confidence and a solid hope for a future. Kids with one or two years left were talking about plans and dreams for advanced education as Mexico does have a lot of options for grants and scholarships to continue on to university studies.

Cozumel is facing a crisis in the youth population. They are bombarded with a lot of negativity. Lack of role models, seeing the corruption and incompetence within the system and lack of a support system, they can more easily be seduced in making poor choices. If they lack self respect, it is unlikely they will have respect for others. If they lack hope, come from a dysfunctional family environment (which becomes more common), too simple to go with the flow, others are doing it, does it really matter? Do I really matter? Substance abuse is a real problem and it is a challenge for kids to grow up in a tourist environment where alcohol over consumption seems the norm. Boy, I want to grow up and be an American, they seem to have everything. I can get drunk, act stupid and put on disgraceful public spectacles too. I don't think it is easy for kids anywhere to grow up these days, they face a lot of obstacles that my generation managed to avoid or somehow survive.

What is needed in the crime reduction program is a little more investment in the youth to prevent future criminal conduct.

The other side, the other face behind the scenes during Carnaval, they set a new record which hopefully will never be matched nor broken. Three attempted suicides in one 24 hour period! One 17 year old, one 18 and one youth of 23, three lives that were almost lost and who remain in the balance. Naturally since it was Carnaval, all government employees and all associated offices of suicide prevention were closed and on holiday. Playa almost lost a young mother of 19 in that same period. Let's hope they receive whatever that might help prevent them making this choice again.
  • 0

#36 Eileen

Eileen

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:31 AM

Our nephew is one of the coaches of the Halcones Dorados -- an American football team whose members come from all levels of economic background. The goal of the group is to give the kids a place where they can feel safe and also allow them to grow into independent, confident, disciplined adults. Having seen them in action when I was down in November, I know they are doing a great job. Beyond playing football, they also embrace community involvement and were out on the east side of the island a few weeks ago taking their turn cleaning up the beaches. The coaches donate alot of their time and energy and also fundraise so that all of the kids have the right equipment. My own suitcase was stuffed with four regulation footballs when I arrived.

There is a good article here about the group:

http://www.tupatroci...6553664557.html

I thought I would let you know that there are parents who care very deeply about their kids and work very hard to bring them up right on the island. I'm sure there are many other similar groups on the island that have the same goal.
  • 0

#37 crunch

crunch

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 626 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas for now
  • Interests:Snorkeling, dogs, margaritas, beaches, reading, working out, chilling.

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:03 PM

Sooo, it is ok for some people to bring/give gifts, but not others apparently.

And carnival is done to pacify the locals for all the lack of resources and opportunities available, but it is also really, really cool?

Does that sum it up? Because that is what you all seem to say.

I am just a touron. I will continue to tip well, be kind and respectful, and donate my dollars to H. Society and Red cross.

However, I think sometimes y'all are extremely condescending of others. I DO realize some deserve that and are real tools. However, many are not.

Not wishing a debate. Just wanted to express a differing opinion/viewpoint.
  • 0

#38 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:19 PM

To sum it up...look up the word "Nihilism".

That is what I think of those who have chosen to fill this thread with their own bullshit.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#39 morenita

morenita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 409 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:25 PM

So what is so wrong about voicing an opinion. Isn't that what this site is about. I love Cozumel and my country and just want to make it a better place to live for everyone. You may think I am just being negative. I disagree but I respect your opinion. And if you feel it necessary to censure or delete items that is your choice as well. I believe open debate and discussion is a good thing.I have often disagreed with the opinions of others her but with the exception of a few I still respect their opinions. There is probably no one I will agree with one hundred percent of the time but we can have a spirited debate without taking anything personal. I take away good points from everyone even when I disagree. I like it when people challenge my ideas. I am forced to defend them which strengthens them or change or modify them when someone can make a better argument.

I stand by everything I post. Never meant to be negative or insult just to make people think.

Yes Crunc h Carnival is a beautiful event for the entire family with many happy people and there are also many poor people who would find it very difficult to participate or attend. I love watching it but it also saddens me to think of all those that could be helped with the money that goes into it. Like paying the police. If this makes me negative , so be it. And yes events like this are used throughout all of Mexico to get people to forget about their dire circumstances. If you do not believe me attend the events held in las fincas and that will open your eyes. If you really want to help people take a trip there and see the conditions people live in. I had said it before we have a saying in spanish AL PUEBLO PAN Y CIRCO which sums it up pretty well. I am just giving an alternative point. In place of candy and toys and beads if you were to pack your suitcases with other items you may actually make a real difference rather than just a fleeting smile. I realize many will disagree and criticize this. That is fine. And some will say you can do both. Donate to a cause and bring things for Carnival. That is also fine. I was just saying that you may want to consider using each effort to bring items here for the people to concentrate on items that will give you "the biggest bang for the buck". Ask the various organizations what items they prefer. I work allot with different schools, which is why I am familiar with Chrysalis (crisalida) and they are always asking for items. Or my fellow med school classmates are involved in getting medicine to those who can't afford it. But donate and give where you like. I am sure all is appreciated. I wold however suggest if you do want to give out candy and toys to buy them here from very small shops to help the local community. I could give you the names of several small shops with owners trying to make a living and in turn help others. Bringing items from the US which can be bought here does not help Cozumel. There are plenty of things you could bring that are hard to get here that would benefit the local community. I suggest filing your suitcase with those. I will not apologize for anything I write. It is my opinion and many would agree with me, including many families watching the parade at Carnival. Sometime ask the parents along the parade if they would rather you pass out candy to their kids or if it was up to them would they prefer something else. I am not saying what people bring is bad. But I do a considerable amount of traveling to Texas for school. And I know when I return I have a limited amount of space and I use it to pack those things that can help the most people in the most important way. Candy and beads would never enter my mind or as Charles said bath salts etc. Yes some will definitely appreciate these things. But many more can be helped with items that are really needed. I do not mean to offend anyone. All I am saying is that for the next Carnival maybe you would consider splitting you luggage to bring items that can make a real difference. There is no reason for anyone to take this negatively. Think about it and make your own decision.
  • 0

#40 cookielady

cookielady

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Yelm WA
  • Interests:Cozumel, animals, reading,travel and friends

Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:05 PM

Ok, here comes my two cents :-) I have been coming here for almost thirty years and this was my first Carnival. It was amazing and I am so thankful I was able to see all the festivities. Yes, I threw beads and Candy, but I also donated to several worthy causes. Sometimes joy is worth more than money. The joy and happiness on all the local faces were priceless. To see the hotels full and the money being spent in the various establishments made my heart feel so good.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users