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Real Black Coral Vs Black Plastic


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#1 Regiomontano

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:35 AM

Hola: last time on the island i remember a talk giving about how to recognise the real black coral bersus black plastic...but i never made it...can you guys help?
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#2 nauticab

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:05 PM

found this on ehow.com
Check for even coloring. Coral has a deep natural color. Inspect the texture for any holes and dents. It should feel smooth.

Look at coral beads closely. Red corals from Tibet and China were white fossilized corals dyed red hundreds of years ago. Although they are real corals, they are sold as imitations of the premier red coral "oxblood" from the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. They are larger with a horn pattern on the ends. Dip the necklace in acetone to check for dye.

Check for authenticity by putting the coral in a glass of cow's milk. If the milk gets a red (or the color of the coral at hand) tinge, the coral is real. In addition, vinegar will bubble when applied on natural coral. If you purchased your jewelry from a reputable store and the price was not too cheap, chances are it is real coral.


Read more: How Can I Tell If My Coral Necklace Is Real? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/...l#ixzz2O2dQekxI
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#3 Steve

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:29 PM

I don't know if it is true but I heard if you put it over a lighter and it starts to melt or smokes it is not black coral.
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#4 pecas

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 07:34 AM

Alternatively you could go to Luis Calaca's shop on 20th between Juarez and Calle 2 (around the corner from Elketra). He'll give you a quick tutorial, you may see him in action and you'll get to see some amazing pieces.
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#5 MarkC

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:20 AM

I don't know if it is true but I heard if you put it over a lighter and it starts to melt or smokes it is not black coral.


LMAO!!!!!!!!!!
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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”

#6 mstevens

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:41 PM

Does it matter? Black coral is endangered and, though pretty, is uncool to purchase. That means fake black coral is also uncool to purchase because it supports a market. Think of faked (not imitation) elephant ivory, sea turtle shell, or whalebone to understand the problem.
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#7 MarkC

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 10:28 AM

Does it matter? Black coral is endangered and, though pretty, is uncool to purchase. That means fake black coral is also uncool to purchase because it supports a market. Think of faked (not imitation) elephant ivory, sea turtle shell, or whalebone to understand the problem.


AGREE 100%
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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”

#8 morenita

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 10:33 AM

AGREE 100%


Tambien
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#9 crunch

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 12:07 PM

Also buying anything but cheap but cool looking fun jewelry in Mexico just isn't like it was 20 years ago. You can get it cheaper and purer here in the US.
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#10 Regiomontano

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:01 PM

It was in my understanding that the black coral in the stores was only dead coral not "harvested" from the living coral on the reefs...and also that was controled its sale...am i wrong?
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#11 MarkC

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 08:49 AM

It was in my understanding that the black coral in the stores was only dead coral not "harvested" from the living coral on the reefs...and also that was controled its sale...am i wrong?


How would you know the difference?
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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”

#12 mstevens

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:31 PM

How would you know the difference?


And, again, why would it matter?

Black coral is listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), along with Great White Sharks, Queen Conch, and other species of interest to divers (and other humans). It requires permits. A group of jewelry company executive were just fined millions of dollars and imprisoned for felony importation of black coral last month. http://www.justice.g...3-enrd-168.html

Trading in protected species, even with permits, is slimy. Who wants to wear black coral jewelry while dining on Panda fritters and drinking tiger blood out of a white rhino horn?
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#13 Regiomontano

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 02:12 PM

How would you know the difference?


TOUCHE!!!!!!!

i was going to buy some B C for my depa...but you open my eyes, NO BLACK CORAL FOR ME!
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#14 MarkC

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 03:11 PM

And, again, why would it matter?


You missed my point. ;)
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“Corona con lima, Corona with lime... Todo el tiempo, hey all of the time... Con mucho gusto, I’m havin such a good time... Corona con lima, Corona with lime...”

#15 mstevens

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 09:55 PM

You missed my point. ;)


No, not really.

You're in the choir. You're not really to whom I'm preaching.
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#16 lid monic

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 11:27 AM

For those of you judging the question being asked, or if someone is buying black coral...try to remember, that just like fur, while politically incorrect now to buy or wear such things, many of these items were made/purchased long before species were endangered or it became unpopular to wear them.  I have a black coral necklace someone left to me in an estate (or so I've been told it is black coral).  It is probably at least 50 years old.  Furs if preserved properly can last as long or longer.  So don't judge someone because they are enquiring, they may not be looking to purchase newly harvested black coral, but are trying to sell/recycle/resell vintage bc.  Nothing is better for the environment or any species than reusing and recycling.  The same argument you are making against purchasing coral can be used against buying gold, or even bottled water.  Petroleum is required to make the plastic, and gold mining is devastating to the environment...especially the water supply!


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#17 marlinfishing

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 11:55 AM

Back in 1981 or '82 I took a young lady to Cozumel and bought her a black coral necklace.  Looked great on her and I'm pretty sure it was legal to buy it then.  That necklace would sure look good on my wife now...  I'm also pretty sure it wouldn't melt if you put a lighter on it. ;)

 

All I'm saying is if you own something that was legal at one point and isn't anymore you don't have to be ashamed to own it or display it.  That's just my opinion.


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"We live in a culture of simulation, in which nothing is what it seems and the image that reigns has no reference to the real world."  (The Art Of War, Sun Tzu)  It is what it is...  THAT never changes.


#18 lid monic

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 12:15 PM

Back in 1981 or '82 I took a young lady to Cozumel and bought her a black coral necklace.  Looked great on her and I'm pretty sure it was legal to buy it then.  That necklace would sure look good on my wife now...  I'm also pretty sure it wouldn't melt if you put a lighter on it. ;)

 

All I'm saying is if you own something that was legal at one point and isn't anymore you don't have to be ashamed to own it or display it.  That's just my opinion.

 

Back in 1981 or '82 I took a young lady to Cozumel and bought her a black coral necklace.  Looked great on her and I'm pretty sure it was legal to buy it then.  That necklace would sure look good on my wife now...  I'm also pretty sure it wouldn't melt if you put a lighter on it. ;)

 

All I'm saying is if you own something that was legal at one point and isn't anymore you don't have to be ashamed to own it or display it.  That's just my opinion.

Couldn't agree more with you marlinfishing.  And I'm not sure if it is illegal, but what are you supposed to do with the stuff from decades and centuries ago...bury it in a landfill somewhere?  Now how is that possibly better? ;)

I wouldn't try the lighter trick either...I'm also reluctant to try the vinegar test :P.


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#19 cvchief

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 03:54 PM

 Who wants to wear black coral jewelry while dining on Panda fritters and drinking tiger blood out of a white rhino horn?

 

 

You obviously have never had a REALLY good panda fritter.  And everyone knows without the tiger blood it just isn't the same.  YUM.


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#20 mstevens

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 10:10 PM

Nothing is better for the environment or any species than reusing and recycling.

 

Most conservationists strongly disagree. If there's a market, species will be collected to meet that market. Thus, attempts are made to limit the market. That means old, new, everything.


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