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Gun Control And Ownership Cozumel Style


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#1 Carey

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 08:44 AM

There's a long thread on pain management meds in the Moving to Cozumel forum.  It got kinda hijacked half way through the discussion, however, by questions by someone thinking of moving here who wants to own a gun.

 

Another poster put up a link to a rolly brooks column saying that extraneros could own guns in Mexico with the proper immigration papers.

 

One thing you will find out after you've actually lived here for awhile is that the place has its own rules.  The Yucatan in general has its own rules if the truth be known.  We are a looooong way from the capital and new laws tend to be implemented slowly and interpreted creatively.

 

Witness the ill-fated casino which had all the right papers but just got closed down time and again.  

 

Maybe you could get a gun legally here but I will bet more than even money that if it is found on your person or you use it on someone in your home, you are going to get thrown in the hosegaw and it will take a good lawyer to explain all about this new law to the authorities before they let you out.

 

Why do you need a gun here?  There is no violent crime except some relationship oriented stuff.  You are going to shoot a weasly little kid who manages to get in your back window because you didn't secure it properly?

 

Living here as an foreigner in the midst of a lot of very low income people automatically makes you rich and a target -- even if all you have to live on is social security.  So before you move here you have to accept this reality and plan accordingly.

 

I contend that a gun is a highly inappropriate way to protect yourself from the only kind of crime you are likely to encounter -- petty burglaries and house break ins.  Better spend that money and give a lot of thought to how to burglar-proof your home, no small job in and of itself as typically structures are so close together that often thieves will drop in from an adjoining roof.

 

Your best protections here are:  Make your place looked lived in whether you are there or not.  This is where a good property manager comes in.  Also, as discussed above, take the time to give a good hard look to the perimeter of your property and do what needs to be done to make it difficult for a thief to get in.

 

If high walls is not an option, rejas -- bars on windows is a must have here.  And it's a good idea even if you DO have high walls.  If you have low walls, invest in 'puntas' iron arrows to put on top of your wall.  or go the cheap way with embedded broken glass.

 

Labor is cheap and good here and boy do they know how to make protectodores!

 

A gun isn't going to do you a lick of good and you talk about a hassle to obtain not to mention cart around with you. 


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#2 cvchief

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 10:50 AM

It is a fascinating discussion.  Apparently you can go online to the Mexican DOD and apply for a permit:  DOD Permit Site

 

I have to say I agree with Carey: Don't shoot ordinary thieves.  Never a good idea, really anywhere, if you can help it.  On second thought, you probably should avoid shooting anyone you don't REALLY have to.

 

However, I guess I would disagree with there being NO violent crime.  There is plenty of violent crime, though it would appear to be contained, as in most places, to those groups engaging in criminal activity. (Seemingly not out of proportion to a city of the size of San Miguel in the US or anywhere, etc etc....)  The property crimes seem to be significant.  I also would never call an burglary 'petty' as people whose homes are broken into deal with a significant shock the the psyche from having their home 'violated.'   

 

Ordinary people seem to be mostly victims of property crimes which tend to be committed by people who would wish avoid confrontation.  I guess that makes it fair to say a permit for a gun in your home but no carry permit probably makes it more like to be stolen than used in home defense, there being far more chance of ordinary burglary than a home invasion.

 

I bet you would have some questions to answer if you popped someone in your home.  You probably should have a good lawyer on retainer and keep a toothbrush handy for a stay as a guest of the gov until it all gets worked out.

 

Of course, there is a middle ground between not owning a gun and shooting people. Like I wear a seat belt all the time, yet still I avoid hitting people with my vehicle.

 

I cite for example the BB gun guy.  As I understand, no BBs were discharged in that incident.  (Probably because he remembered his mom's sage advice, "You'll shoot your eye out kid!")  However, I bet those fellers were heeling and toeing right proper when he came after them with that implement.  That was $200 well spend I would say.  Who knows what legal trouble he might have gotten in if he got in a fight with them and hurt one?

 

Please note I said nothing about whether people should or shouldn't have guns in MX, as I will try hard to avoid entering into that argument.  Though I did have a lovely discussion with a gentleman from Cali that had differing opinions from I on the subject.  We debated politely for long about 3 cervesa at Mosaica.

 

You might construe I did say people should own BB guns.  If you think that, remember I also said you might shoot your eye out.

 

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#3 Coz2wonder

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 01:23 PM

Being a gun owner, and having a concealed weapons permit in the states, I have no problem with guns.  However, it wouldn't be a good idea to bring or use a firearm here.

 

The laws here are very different. Juvenile laws are non existent, and thief/break in's are expected, if given the opportunity.

 

Unless you are met with equal force, using any type of weapon is consider, on your part, to be excessive force. 

 

I keep a machete, and a maple wood walking stick at ready.  

 

This is not Kansas, and Dorothy doesn't live here anymore, but it is a HELL of a lot better then anywhere else in the world.


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#4 cvchief

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 07:37 PM

Well, part of that applies everywhere.  In the context of self defense, It is never a good idea to USE a firearm,( i.e. discharge it.) Anywhere.  Anytime.  I would suggest you should never, ever, do it unless it is the absolute last resort.

 

Probably the same with the machete.  Lopping off the occasional thief arm is probably also frowned upon I bet.

 

Of course, machete, firearm or BB rifle all make great tools for communicating the downside of an actor pursuing a course of action contrary to the wishes of a victim. It often provides sufficent education to engender a change of course on the part of the actor without the need to actually lop off, shoot or take the eye out of the perp.

 

Speaking of no violent crime, did you read the FB report of the guy getting robbed by a pair of thieves who cracked his teeth with a moto helmet?   Supposedly the victim reacted with the keys in his hand and thinks he did some significant ocular damage to one perp.

 

Sounds like it was closing time at the bars, so maybe this team was out looking to roll drunks.  Not a good thing.  They got a pic of the guy flashing gang signs.  I am not a gang guy, but it looks to me like it might be Latin Kings or MS13.  'course he could just be a wanna be.


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#5 marlinfishing

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 07:47 PM

There's a long thread on pain management meds in the Moving to Cozumel forum.  It got kinda hijacked half way through the discussion, however, by questions by someone thinking of moving here who wants to own a gun.

 

Another poster put up a link to a rolly brooks column saying that extraneros could own guns in Mexico with the proper immigration papers.

 

One thing you will find out after you've actually lived here for awhile is that the place has its own rules.  The Yucatan in general has its own rules if the truth be known.  We are a looooong way from the capital and new laws tend to be implemented slowly and interpreted creatively.

 

Witness the ill-fated casino which had all the right papers but just got closed down time and again.  

 

Maybe you could get a gun legally here but I will bet more than even money that if it is found on your person or you use it on someone in your home, you are going to get thrown in the hosegaw and it will take a good lawyer to explain all about this new law to the authorities before they let you out.

 

Why do you need a gun here?  There is no violent crime except some relationship oriented stuff.  You are going to shoot a weasly little kid who manages to get in your back window because you didn't secure it properly?

 

Living here as an foreigner in the midst of a lot of very low income people automatically makes you rich and a target -- even if all you have to live on is social security.  So before you move here you have to accept this reality and plan accordingly.

 

I contend that a gun is a highly inappropriate way to protect yourself from the only kind of crime you are likely to encounter -- petty burglaries and house break ins.  Better spend that money and give a lot of thought to how to burglar-proof your home, no small job in and of itself as typically structures are so close together that often thieves will drop in from an adjoining roof.

 

Your best protections here are:  Make your place looked lived in whether you are there or not.  This is where a good property manager comes in.  Also, as discussed above, take the time to give a good hard look to the perimeter of your property and do what needs to be done to make it difficult for a thief to get in.

 

If high walls is not an option, rejas -- bars on windows is a must have here.  And it's a good idea even if you DO have high walls.  If you have low walls, invest in 'puntas' iron arrows to put on top of your wall.  or go the cheap way with embedded broken glass.

 

Labor is cheap and good here and boy do they know how to make protectodores!

 

A gun isn't going to do you a lick of good and you talk about a hassle to obtain not to mention cart around with you. 

Hi Carey, that would be me who hijacked my own pain mgmt. thread.  I should have started a new topic. I'm new & that's my bad!   I have been never shot a human nor had the need to do so.  My wife is disabled & when I go to work every day I know she has a gun & the proper training to use it should a "petty" criminal break into our home.  It happens in our neighborhood, but not often.  I can't always be there w/her & she can't kick someone's butt.  If she's at the house in Cozumel alone & someone is breaking in, what do you suggest?  It's insurance plain & simple.  If all it takes is money, paperwork & time I don't understand your concern.  I do NOT believe that someone breaking into my property is petty or to be expected.  Just wasn't raised that way & if that's how it is in Cozumel I probably need to rethink my plans.  I do apologize for hijacking my pain mgmt. thread.  Lesson learned.


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#6 marlinfishing

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 07:52 PM

It is a fascinating discussion.  Apparently you can go online to the Mexican DOD and apply for a permit:  DOD Permit Site

 

I have to say I agree with Carey: Don't shoot ordinary thieves.  Never a good idea, really anywhere, if you can help it.  On second thought, you probably should avoid shooting anyone you don't REALLY have to.

 

However, I guess I would disagree with there being NO violent crime.  There is plenty of violent crime, though it would appear to be contained, as in most places, to those groups engaging in criminal activity. (Seemingly not out of proportion to a city of the size of San Miguel in the US or anywhere, etc etc....)  The property crimes seem to be significant.  I also would never call an burglary 'petty' as people whose homes are broken into deal with a significant shock the the psyche from having their home 'violated.'   

 

Ordinary people seem to be mostly victims of property crimes which tend to be committed by people who would wish avoid confrontation.  I guess that makes it fair to say a permit for a gun in your home but no carry permit probably makes it more like to be stolen than used in home defense, there being far more chance of ordinary burglary than a home invasion.

 

I bet you would have some questions to answer if you popped someone in your home.  You probably should have a good lawyer on retainer and keep a toothbrush handy for a stay as a guest of the gov until it all gets worked out.

 

Of course, there is a middle ground between not owning a gun and shooting people. Like I wear a seat belt all the time, yet still I avoid hitting people with my vehicle.

 

I cite for example the BB gun guy.  As I understand, no BBs were discharged in that incident.  (Probably because he remembered his mom's sage advice, "You'll shoot your eye out kid!")  However, I bet those fellers were heeling and toeing right proper when he came after them with that implement.  That was $200 well spend I would say.  Who knows what legal trouble he might have gotten in if he got in a fight with them and hurt one?

 

Please note I said nothing about whether people should or shouldn't have guns in MX, as I will try hard to avoid entering into that argument.  Though I did have a lovely discussion with a gentleman from Cali that had differing opinions from I on the subject.  We debated politely for long about 3 cervesa at Mosaica.

 

You might construe I did say people should own BB guns.  If you think that, remember I also said you might shoot your eye out.

 

A-Christmas-Story.jpg

Probably watched that movie 10 times!  It's good one.


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#7 marlinfishing

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 08:08 PM

Well, part of that applies everywhere.  In the context of self defense, It is never a good idea to USE a firearm,( i.e. discharge it.) Anywhere.  Anytime.  I would suggest you should never, ever, do it unless it is the absolute last resort.

 

Probably the same with the machete.  Lopping off the occasional thief arm is probably also frowned upon I bet.

 

Of course, machete, firearm or BB rifle all make great tools for communicating the downside of an actor pursuing a course of action contrary to the wishes of a victim. It often provides sufficent education to engender a change of course on the part of the actor without the need to actually lop off, shoot or take the eye out of the perp.

 

Speaking of no violent crime, did you read the FB report of the guy getting robbed by a pair of thieves who cracked his teeth with a moto helmet?   Supposedly the victim reacted with the keys in his hand and thinks he did some significant ocular damage to one perp.

 

Sounds like it was closing time at the bars, so maybe this team was out looking to roll drunks.  Not a good thing.  They got a pic of the guy flashing gang signs.  I am not a gang guy, but it looks to me like it might be Latin Kings or MS13.  'course he could just be a wanna be.

Your 1st (3) paragraphs said what I really wanted to say.  All I want is for Lorrie to be safe in OUR home when I'm not there.  She can't swing a machete.  She's just not that strong.  I don't fear criminals.  I'll go toe to toe w/them.  It's all about Lorrie.  I don't want to swagger around San Miguel w/a gun strapped on my waist and it'll probably never leave our safe.  I don't even carry a my gun here in TX unless I'm traveling w/Lorrie.  But it'll be there in the house if she needs it..  I didn't know this would upset people & that wasn't my intent.  Any further questions I have about this will not be posted in this forum.  I'm here looking for info. 


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#8 Charles

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:41 AM

........." I have no problem with guns.  However, it wouldn't be a good idea to bring or use a firearm here.

 

The laws here are very different. Juvenile laws are non existent, and thief/break in's are expected, if given the opportunity"..........

 

The law is very different and even if you were willing to spend the couple thousand dollars (?). I'd be surprised if you could pull it off for under that amount. At the very least you'd need legal representation to make it happen. Factor travel costs of going to the ONE gun store in the country. Compared to what you're up against at procuring normal pain medication, obtaining legal Oxycotin will be an easy walk in the park vs. having a gun permit and completing the purchase.

 

You are not going to bring a handgun to Mexico, I can not believe that would ever happen and buying one at the ONE gun store in the country will not be cheap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 ........" she can't kick someone's butt.  If she's at the house in Cozumel alone & someone is breaking in, what do you suggest"? 

 

 

 if that's how it is in Cozumel I probably need to rethink my plans". 

 

I'd suggest getting a good dog. I assume we'd all agree that a 22 caliber does not qualify as a defensive weapon. Eliminating that one, which caliber would you prefer a .380 or a 38? All other calibers are reserved for exclusive use of the military or law enforcement. If you could get permitted for a .380 semi-automatic, I'd suggest extra clips.

 

 

......."All I want is for Lorrie to be safe in OUR home when I'm not there. It's all about Lorrie...... it'll probably never leave our safe.  

 

But it'll be there in the house if she needs it..  I didn't know this would upset people & that wasn't my intent". ......

 

 

I too am very comfortable with gun ownership in the States, but I would never consider it in Mexico. If it is for Lorrie's use then perhaps she'd need to have a license or maybe you both. If the gun is in the safe, how quickly can you get it in hand, lock and load? Would a .380 in the safe provide a feeling of safety and security?

 

Read my post in the pain management thread. What is another word for inspector....extortionist! Think about this really carefully, do you want to be the one known gringo registered gun owner on the island? Do you want to be well known to all the law enforcement officials, all branches on the island? Would you mind being "inspected" about every time some one or some thing has a very small hole?

 

If you're concern is Lorrie, I'd suggest buying her a dog. I'm personally partial to Dobermans, but Rottweilers are an excellent breed with good intimidation aspects.

 

I wish you luck, but it seems the deck is stacked against you. If moving to Cozumel requires good pain medication and a gun, those are the two most strictly regulated items in the country. Although technically both legal and available within extremely strict, limited fashion, in all practicality, they both do not exist in Mexico.

 

Besides the dog, you could rent a security guard cheaply. You'd still need the dog to keep an eye on the guard who will not be armed. Many aspects of Cozumel can be Alice and Wonderland or Planet of the Apes, but it is most definitely not the Wizard of OZ. You are not in Texas anymore.


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#9 mslf500

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 07:00 AM

As a gun owner, I've also wondered about having one in Cozumel. I've only had to pull one of mine out one time in the US and that was to save a guy who was being shot by a Tech 9.

 

I'm a very good shot with a pistol and a rifle and have a concealed carry permit just to be legal if I do decide to go CC.

 

The thing about a gun is, if you pull it out, you need to understand that it escalates the rules very quickly and if confronted you may have to use it or risk having it used on you. A cop friend told me once, "The sound of a 12 gauge shell being chambered in a pump shotgun has a very calming effect on people". So did my lever action rifle at the time.

 

For someone who isn't an expert shot and doesn’t regular practice, I'd suggest a shotgun with bird shot (or even rock salt). You can even buy a pistol that shoots 410 shotgun shells. It isn't going to stop a crazed maniac, but it will knock the snot out of a little sh_t breaking into your house. He'll be able to run away, but he has some painful pellet picking time ahead of him.

 

A pistol in a concrete house with armor jacket or hollow point bullets is going to cause all kinds of ricochet issues, so consider fragmentation shells or rat shot.

 

A dog will certainly be the best option.

 

Once the perp is in your house, I personally think a shortened Louisville Slugger is an excellent close-in defense item. Shorten a 28" bat and put a leather leash on the end you hold onto so the bat is secure to your hands. Then wail away, but stay away from the head. Go for the ribs, arms and thighs. Let him know you "care". Softer defensive items that leave bruises, but don't put them in a coma are better for the face, maybe your tennis shoe after he has been "somewhat "subdued? I mean you gotta let them know you care and he needs a story to tell his friends. (Corollary #1- Scars are tattoos with better stories.)

 

But if you really want to be the neighborhood bad ass, the Centurion AK-47 Pistol with a 30 round clip is the way to go. The ricochets will probably hurt you in a concrete house, but it will certainly get you on the cover of Por Esto or one of the other local rags. http://www.shootingi...Pistol-cmyk.jpg

 

A lot of this is tongue in cheek, but I am laughing......


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#10 Coz2wonder

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:35 AM

There may be a very simple solution to enhancing the protection of your wife, and that would be to buy/rent a condo that has security 24/7.

 

It is true the security would not be armed, but it would be less likely that an intruder would enter the premises.


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#11 crunch

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:05 PM

I think it is is nuts to even consider.  If you ever use it (or your wife) i bet whoever uses it will end up in a mexican jail for a very long time regardless of the justification.  Carey knows how things work in Mexico.  It would not end up well for you or your wife.  Just some mace or something along with proper safeguards should be plenty.


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#12 Coz2wonder

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:41 PM

Agree with Crunch.  

 

But, I think if I had those types of concerns, and needs perhaps Mexico isn't the best choice.

 

Also, don't trust anybody who says 'I can get what you need"...but I am sure most sane people know that.


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#13 Carey

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:58 PM

I really don't know how everything works in Mexico.  At all.  For one thing, a lot of national policies and laws are in flux right now.  And we have a new local administration coming in.  So please don't take my word as the bible, anyone.  

 

I am just offering an opinion based on 12 years of living on the island full time and watching how things go.  They very often don't go by the book here and lot of odd, funny things happen.  Or maybe you wouldn't think it was so funny depending on which end of the stick you were on.

 

Bottom line is having a gun to protect yourself is rank overkill.  They don't rape or murder or torture people here.  They just steal their stuff if they get the chance.  Only way you're going to get hurt is if you get caught in the crossfire.

 

So to live here securely, secure your perimeter. Make it harder to get into your place than one that's a block away.

 

 This is the way life is in any country where there is no zoning, no gated communities.  Fancy houses are sandwiched right next door to stick houses.  Of COURSE there's going to be have nots looking for opportunities to take from the Haves.  Not everyone.  Most of the people here are honest and good-hearted.  But there is certainly that element here.  And they aren't just preying on ex pats.  The well to do Mexicans who live here, and there are many, have the same kinds of problems.


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#14 marlinfishing

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 06:00 PM

I appreciate everyone's input very much.  Once again, I apologize for not starting a new topic in the middle of the Pain Mgmt thread.  My bad!  My mind works too fast sometimes.  You all are a valuable resource & give great info!

 

David


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#15 CZMDM

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:33 AM

 

 

However, I guess I would disagree with there being NO violent crime.  There is plenty of violent crime, though it would appear to be contained, as in most places, to those groups engaging in criminal activity. (Seemingly not out of proportion to a city of the size of San Miguel in the US or anywhere, etc etc....)  The property crimes seem to be significant.  I also would never call an burglary 'petty' as people whose homes are broken into deal with a significant shock the the psyche from having their home 'violated.'   

 

 

 

 

There have been 750+ robberies this year. There are gangs attacking women on mopeds. There have been many incidents of muggings and it is only getting worse. The NA response seems to be to get up on a soap box, shouting to the world that the island is crime free, while they hire security to watch their houses, so that they can go to neighborhood watch meetings. I have lived in a couple of tough cities but I have never lived in a place where the robbery per capita was so high. I have never lived in a place where guys on mopeds are stalking women. And I have never been in a place where so many people are in utter deniel. Home robbery doesn't sound like much until it happens to you. I was robbed once and the local NA communtiy focused the blame on us, because of the size of our house. Totally ridiculous if you ask me.


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#16 cvchief

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 07:17 AM

CZ,

 

Well there ya go.  I wasn't sure on the use of the term 'robbery' in reports.  Typically, robbery is a the use of force against a person to take property, but as often is the case the news confused it with burglary which typically the entry into a property usually to commit a theft.  I knew there were some purse snacking robberies, but I didn't realize it was as bad as you say. 

 

If you have been a victim of a burglary, you know it isn't a minor thing.  However, you combined people willing to do robberies with people will to do burglaries and you have a mix that can result in people willing to enter an occupied home and take things by force.  Not good.


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#17 CZMDM

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 08:13 AM

CZ,

 

Well there ya go.  I wasn't sure on the use of the term 'robbery' in reports.  Typically, robbery is a the use of force against a person to take property, but as often is the case the news confused it with burglary which typically the entry into a property usually to commit a theft.  I knew there were some purse snacking robberies, but I didn't realize it was as bad as you say. 

 

If you have been a victim of a burglary, you know it isn't a minor thing.  However, you combined people willing to do robberies with people will to do burglaries and you have a mix that can result in people willing to enter an occupied home and take things by force.  Not good.

 

Dude I was attacked by a guy with a screw driver in my own entry way, in my own house on Christmas eve. Tell me about it. :)


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Cozumel Diving


#18 mstevens

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 08:43 AM

My wife was robbed by 2 kids on a scooter near our house and significantly injured in the process. The outcome would not have been in the least different if she'd had a weapon of any sort. I suppose she might have shot one in the back as they sped off, but then she'd be in prison right now. As noted above, no sort of weapon will prevent a burglary (since nobody's confronting anyone).

 

If I felt as if I needed a weapon for safety in my home, I'd move to some place where I didn't feel that way.


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#19 Carey

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 08:54 AM

Our compound has been burgaled 4 times in 15 years.  Each time it was caused by a lapse of security on our part.  Time 1 was a bicycle theft. Still don't know how that got gone but it was at a time when we still had a property manager and so keys were spread around among the staff.

 

Time #2 someone climbed in our small kitchen window and got some music CDs.  We had left the window unlocked. Still under property management at that time so key problem was probably involved in that case as well.

 

Time #3 was many years later and they got my laptop and purse which I had left in a room with an unlocked door to the outside. (The outer gate to the compound was double bolted and I had gotten lax about security checking every night on my doors within the compound.)

 

Since then  I never leave that or any other exterior-leading door unlocked.  Made it a habit.  Plus I started examining our perimeter and realized where the thief had probably entered -- over our front wall where, once they were boosted up, they could land on top of our tinaco and easily get down to ground level from there.  They didn't get in with a key because I changed all the locks after robbery number 2 and only 3 highly trusted friends possess keys now.  And a whole lot of iron puntas were added anywhere where the walls weren't 9 ft high.

 

Time #4 was a couple of months ago.  And it had to have been the last place i forgot about -- the roof of the shacks behind our high wall have a section where you can climb onto our 9 feet wall, ooch along straddling the wall for about 6 feet, then jump down on the roof of our pool house and then you're in.  That time they got nothing because all 15 exterior doors within the compound were locked.  I knew someone had gotten in, however, because they threw a loose padlock they found in a pile in my garage and hurled it through my kitchen window in an attempt to reach in and unlock it. But since it was deadbolted, they couldn't open the window even with the glass broken.

 

I am 95% sure this was the entry point because a few days before I caught a kid peering down into my sala from the roof next door beyond the wall.  When I waved, he ducked away.  Dead giveaway.  He'd probably been spying on us from up there for a week and had figured out he could get in via the pool house roof.  Watched to see when we turned off the lights and went to bed for a week or more until he knew our schedule.  Then, in and out he went.  Empty handed, little arse

 

This is all to say that I am not a stranger to burglary.  And yes, it is upsetting to say the least.  But I use the term 'petty' because, compared to being frightened, physically injured or worse, it is paltry in my personal book.

 

And, yes, I now have iron arrow 'puntas' along that section of backwall that offered access to the pool house roof.

 

The unfortunate women who were injured in purse snatchings? I have nothing but sympathy for them.  However, I'm sure they all wish they had just let that puppy go right away instead of fighting for it.  I believe that's the advice the police usually give, don't they?  I don't carry valuable stuff in my purse for that reason.  No credit cards.  No visa card, for example. Not much cash.

 

We live in a CITY.  There is always going to be crime in a city. Comes with the territory.  So people who can't take the heat, should get out of the fire and move to a gated community in Lake Ajjic near Guadalajara. (Although I hear the lake there is drying right up.)

 

Or move back to the states.  But don't make it in the inner city.  Because you think you got trouble here, try Gritty City US style if you wanna see some serious crime.


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#20 crunch

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:07 PM

I don't doubt that there is plenty of crime and that Cozumel is not some wonderful nirvanna with happy sweet contented local citizens who just love the foreigners.  I know that is not the case.

 

My only point is that for a foreigner to bring a gun into Mexico and use it is a recipe for disaster.  Look at the whimsical way car accidents are treated.  Almost always it is the "rich foreigners" fault no matter what really happened.  The reality is except in rare cases the non-local is the one who will get in trouble if any harm occurs.  Just the way it is.

 

So practice reasonable stuff as advised above, but leave the guns in the US.  Just for your own well being!


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