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Walk Around The Yard This Morning


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#1 Coz2wonder

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 08:19 AM

My orchid is in bloom. The stems are between 4 and 7 feet long with the orchid on the end. The aroma of caramel candy is in the air.

 

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#2 mstevens

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 08:33 AM

Wow!

We are really hoping to get going on a garden project, but for now must content ourselves with the bougainvillea at the house and pictures from people like you.
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#3 Coz2wonder

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 08:43 AM

It's a jungle out here!  The orchids I never touch. I don't water them, I don't move them, I do nothing to bother them.

 

When I get a small orchid, I take the "burlap" from a coconut palm, and make a pocket.  I put a tiny amount of charcoal into the pocket, insert the orchid, and tie them in a loose bundle with twine.

 

I mount them on driftwood using twine,  Then I attach it to a living tree in semi or full shade.  The roots will work their way around the tree, and will be long secured by the time the twine disintegrates.

 

We have TONS of elephant ears, walking iris, and white lily like plants that grow on the east side.  They are very fragrant, and all the plants are self propagating.


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#4 Carey

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:21 AM

Living out in the selva, Jungle Gal Paula already has plenty of shade trees.  But if you live in the city as we do, you do well to plant your own because it can make a 10 degree difference, we've found, to have that lovely shade.  Best trees for us, ones that grow incredibly fast in pretty horrible, limestone soil are: cayomitos and papayas.  Also zapotes of various types.  Our favorites are the cayomitos, however, as the under leaves are golden and then arch beautifully as they grow provided they are pruned properly.

 

If you want a temporary tree to provide quick shade -- grows almost 10 feet per year -- get a meringa or two.  There's a gardener somewhere on the island who is harvesting the meringa leaves and making them into edibles.  She's probably the only one who would have these.  They grow like weeds.  We used them until our slower growing trees got big and then cut them down.

 

We also some huge Norfolk Island pines.  They don't offer as much in the way of shade but they grow huge, don't take up much of a foot print and offer very nice contrast to other trees. They grow very well here. You will see the tall pine spikes at a number of places around town.  Ours are at least 50 feet tall by this point.

 

Advise against bananas, a dirty tree and all the bananas come in at once and you get sick of them.  Totally don't plant a banyan/fichus as they need a half acre minimum if you don't want them uprooting your pipe and concrete in 4 or 5 years.  Advise against royal palms.  They are truly lovely and we have 4 extremely giant ones.  But they drop their fronds -- huge, heavy branches -- at unexpected moments making them actually kind of dangerous.  Sometimes the fronds will hang by a thread for literally weeks and you have to stay away from that area of the garden the entire time.

 

4 o'clocks grow from seed here and have a lovely aroma.  They like it here.


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#5 marlinfishing

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:13 PM

I know we're at least (4) years from moving there, but I'm looking forward to gardening in a tropical atmoshere.  There's a tree on the island I love.  It has orange blossoms & I think the locals call it "Flamboya".  Does it grow quickly?  Is it a good tree to have?  I'd like to know so I can exclude it from my day dreams if it's a negative plant to have in the yard.  Thanks!

 

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#6 Coz2wonder

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:41 PM

Ding, ding, ding you are correct, it is Flamboya.

 

I have smaller ones I have grown from the seed.  They grow fast, but can also be a little screwy for a while.  We are shaping ours into an arch over our steps to the patio.  

They are very messy, seed pods, and flowers blown in the wind.  You do not want them around your pool.  

 

But, they are spectacular in bloom!  The town is just a cascade of orange!


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#7 Carey

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:52 PM

It's flamboyan with an 'n' I think?

 

I forgot about that tree.  They are very pretty but, for us, extremely slow growers compared to the others I've named.  And they have thorns like the bougainvillea.

 

I used to love bougainvilleas and still do, actually.  But the thorns are a real pain.  Make it difficult to prune them when they get bigger.  And they do.  So budget for a gardener if you want a lot of those.  I know a good one who has taken over that job for us now that our bougs are pretty huge.

 

Tulipans -- hibiscus -- tend to grow very well here.  The red blossomed ones grow huge and thrive.  Huge as in 15 feet or more.  Other varieties remain more bush like.


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#8 marlinfishing

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:07 PM

Another of my day dreams is growing tomatoes.  I love home grown tomatoes, but they are hard to grow in the summer heat here, 105-110 Farenheit.  If I prepare a soil base for them to grow has anyone had luck w/them?

 

Never mind, I did a search and found a post from Paula from 2012 on the subject.  Sorry to not do my homework first.  Feel free to delete.


Edited by marlinfishing, 25 June 2014 - 02:50 PM.

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#9 Coz2wonder

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 04:17 PM

talking about gardening, and growing things is an interesting topic.  Repeats are no problem.

 

Cherry tomatoes I swear will grown on concret here!  The hanging tomatoes did okay, but they didn't get big, like Big Boy Tomatoes.

Have a crop of plum tomatoes in containers on the patio.

 

The seeds are limited here, but a lot of the veggies you buy have seeds, dry them, and plant them.

I am growing peppers right now from the seeds I collected.  Jalapenos are great to grow, and the plant lasts a long time, and just keeps producing.

 

Potatoes (white, and sweet) grew well for me.  Iguanas don't like potatoes, so no problem there.

Carrots were a little strange though.  You need pretty deep soil for them to grown long.

Always have chives, basil growing, and mint.

 

Trees:  Think about a Soursop/Guyabano tree.  It's a very nice tree, and produce an interesting fruit.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soursop

 

Start planning your garden, you have options.


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#10 marlinfishing

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 04:28 PM

Cherry & plum tomatoes are fine w/me!  I just can't grow them in the midsummer/late summer heat here.  I can legally bring seeds to Mexico, just no live plants, right?  As long as they aren't genetically changed let me add.  If not, I can get seeds from any living plant on the island and plant them.  Thanks, my day dream continues....


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#11 Steve

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 05:30 PM

Every year I bring seeds down for people and most of them get confiscated. I put them in different spots in my suitcase or carry on. Sometimes they don't find all of them. The ones I open up and dump in my suitcase usually get through but they are a pain to try and find and sort out again.


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#12 Pirata Canadiense

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:53 PM

Are there any particularly good climbing (flowering) vines you'd recommend that are readily available?  We have some sort of viney, climbing-thing all around our back and side walls LOL!  While it's nice enough (and covers the cement walls quite well), some more colour and flowers would be nice.  I think there's enough dirt at the side of the house to plant something that could climb the existing plants, then we'd have a nicer view out the windows.


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