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#1 kc5tng

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:26 AM

My wife and I have a good friend who was on a recent cruise to coz and he and I are both 100% disabled Army Vets from the Vietnam "conflict" as they so mildly put it...and he said within a year, he is moving to Coz, permanently.  And my wife and I are thinking seriously about doing the same thing.

 

I have tons of questions about living in Coz ;

 

What is the present crime rate in Coz and how often are Retirees and etc from other countries affected by said crimes?

 

What is the "seasons" like as far as temperatures go?  do the homes for sale in Coz have central heat and cooling or separate units?

 

Are the foods you find in the grocery store(s) similar to the ones we find in the states or not?  

 

We know we will need to "learn the lingo" but is English understood and spoken a lot in Coz or no?

 

Im am also a classic rock-classic country & new country drummer/vocalist - are there any clubs in the area that have this kind of music as I want to continue performing as I have been in our home state of Oklahoma

.

Would driving our car thru mexico from Juarez to Coz be an adivisable thing to do, or should we consider buying one locally?

 


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#2 Kandy

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:32 AM

I'd recommend an extended vacation here before moving. A cruise trip can't give you the experience you need to make such a decision. I'm not suggesting that you not move here, simply that it seems you haven't been here based on your questions. I think there is a Moving to Cozumel forum here that you can read through to get tons of information.


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#3 kc5tng

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 11:43 AM

I just found the Forum you mentioned - and will post these questions there . . . we were planning to spend a week in Coz - possibly in Oct or Nov just to see the local life in Coz. And thank you for the reply - its appreciated~!


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#4 Coz2wonder

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 12:48 PM

I can answer some of your questions, I have been a resident of the island for 12 years.

 

What is the present crime rate in Coz and how often are Retirees and etc from other countries affected by said crimes?

Compared to NOB (north of the border) Cozumel is doing pretty well.  There are crimes of opportunity.  Home burglaries, purse snatching, scooters thief.  The expat community is not exempt from these types of crimes, but in my opinion they are also not targets.

 

The police have a Facebook page if you want current information on what police action is going on:https://www.facebook...242?ref=profile

 

 

What is the "seasons" like as far as temperatures go?  do the homes for sale in Coz have central heat and cooling or separate units?

Right now we are in low season, and higher temp's, and humidity.  The average at my casa has been 90 degrees.  It can get "cool" in the winter months, but houses here do not have central heat.  You most likely would not rent a house (that you would want to live in) that does not have AC.  Mini-Splits are popular here, and more cost effective.

*your largest expense will be your electric bill if you run your AC 24x7.  It could easily be more then your rent.  So, my suggestion is that you use the AC in the evening, and have ceiling fans on during the day.

 

Are the foods you find in the grocery store(s) similar to the ones we find in the states or not?  

Cozumel is missing some of the comfort foods you may be used to NOB, but these days you can find a great deal of what you are used too.

 

We know we will need to "learn the lingo" but is English understood and spoken a lot in Coz or no?

English is spoken in the tourist areas.   The grocery stores will have someone who can speak English most of the time.  The need for Spanish really comes into play when you need to engage with the local population, and merchants.  I have gotten by with limited Spanish, but it has not always served me well when trying to purchase nuts, and bolts, or answering the phone.  Learn as much as you can to get by.

 

Im am also a classic rock-classic country & new country drummer/vocalist - are there any clubs in the area that have this kind of music as I want to continue performing as I have been in our home state of Oklahoma

 

Rock, Jazz and Cuban music seem to be mostly what I hear.  However, it sounds like you have many skills and can find a gig to jam with.  Check out Wet Wendy's, and Woody's for starters.

 

Would driving our car thru mexico from Juarez to Coz be an advisable thing to do, or should we consider buying one locally?

If you're coming on a tourist Visa, you can stay for 180 days.  You can drive your car down (with international insurance), but you and the vehicle must exit the country at that time.

If you want to apply for Temporary Residence you can stay and renew annually, and you can drive your foreign plated vehicle. The car plates must be current, and you need to purchase international insurance.  *The process for TR, and PR must be applied for in your home country.

If you apply for Permanent Residence, then you have a choice.  You may be able to import your vehicle (runs between $1,500-$2,500 or up) depending on the age, and where the car was manufactured, but if you can not import it, you LEGALLY CAN NOT DRIVE A FOREIGN PLATED CAR with a permanent residence status.  It will be at the risk of having the vehicle confiscated.

 

Next questions to put on your list are:  health care, and medical insurance, and cost of living.

 

Take your time, ask lots of questions before you pull the trigger.  It is an enjoyable lifestyle, but you are also moving from everything you're familiar with.  Lots to think about.


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#5 kc5tng

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 03:49 PM

I sure appreciate your help and advice.  Here's another question for ya . . . As far as learning the language - Ive wondered if that Rosetta Stone would be something we might consider buying as far as learning Spanish.  Or are there any in Coz who are bi-lingual and who "teach" the language for a fee that you would recommend?

 

Cost Of Living:  Of course, I need to know this - why I did not ask this question makes me wonder "what was I thinkin"??  My wife cooks most all our meals at home - we eat out some but most of the time - we limit our eating out to "fast food" joints . . . once in a while we eat at one of the better restaurants  - to give my wife a "break" - truth is, with the exception of eating at "mexican food restaurants", my wife cooks as good if not better than most restaurants.  We have Dish Network at home here - I read somewhere that Direct TV is available in most areas - is that true for Dish Network as well or no and are the viewing packages with Direct TV the same in mexico as they are in the US?   

What about our little dog?  What will we need to do to bring her along with us?  Proof of Shots from a vet I suppose , but what else might we need?  Is canned and dry dog food available in the grocery stores ( I assume there is more than One grocery store in town) .  We dont smoke so we wont worry about tobacco products to buy - Anything come to mind we might need that we dont need here in the states?

 

Medical coverage is something I havent given much thought to as my wife and I are both "Choctaw" american indians and I am a 100% VA disabled veteran and the VA takes care of all my medical issues - but in Mexico, that will not be an option so yes, we will need information concerning "Medical Insurance Policies and procedures explained and a list of the companies you would recommend checking out and the reasons why you would recommend them. I had forgotten completely about Medical Care - so how is the Medical Care in Coz?  Any good hospitals and or clinics there?  Whats the cost of Medical Insurance for 2 - complete.

Gee, Im writing a "Novel" here - When we do come for the 7 days, my wife and I would be honored to meet you and your significant other for a fine meal - all on us - just for being so darned nice and answering all these questions. 


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#6 mstevens

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 04:40 PM

Learning Spanish depends on your learning style. Some like Rosetta Stone, I like Fluenz, others like other things. There are language schools on the island, or you could sign up for classes at your local community college for cheap.

 

Food budget can probably be lower than yours now as long as you're not growing food of your own.

 

TV satellites have specific footprints, and it's going to be very difficult to get a usable signal from US small dish satellite providers. You'll probably need cable or Sky if you want TV.

 

Of course there's dog food on the island. It might not be your preferred brand.

 

There's pretty good medical care on the island and good specialty care on the mainland. I have no idea of the cost of insurance, but "complete" is a relative concept in the world of insurance. Medical care is less expensive in Mexico, but medication can be more expensive and not everything is available.

 

Please don't take this as overly critical, but I really think that if you don't know the grocery store situation on the island that you're getting way ahead of yourself even considering a move. (There are lots, by the way.)


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#7 Coz2wonder

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 05:15 PM

You're coming for 7 days in Nov.  Spend some of that time getting familiar with the lay of the land.  Visit the grocery stores.  Mega, Chedrui's, Saldana, Soriana, AKI. Lots of little mom and pop stores all over the place, plus we have a couple of 7-11's and OXXO (same thing, different name).

 

Take a look at this real estate page which is similar to MLS listings, it will give you a good idea of housing costs:http://www.ampicozumel.com/

 

I would stop in the Medical clinic and hospital, and talk to them as it applies to your insurance.  I know of only one clinic that takes foreign insurance, but you would have to speak with them as to exactly what insurance they take.  Your costs will be out of pocket first, then reimbursement from your insurance company.  Clinics and hospital: San Miguel Clinic, The Cozumel Hyperbaric Chamber and Clinic, and CMC hospital.

 

Apt/house rentals  from $250 bucks a month and up.  The average can be $500-700.  Remember your electric will be on you. 

 

Just use the search engine to find all the information you need on importing your dog.

 

As to cost of living.  Some can live very frugal, but my recommendation is the target figure would be $3k min a month.  

 

Don't forget we have hurricanes, and you do need to be parepared for those.  There is a whole folder that discusses it under "Weather".


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#8 Steve

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:16 PM

I don't live on the island but visit quite often. I can live there very well for $1500 per month and still travel. My lifestyle isn't that demanding but I do party a lot. I think 7 days on the island is way to much time to spend in order to decide if you whant to move there or not. LOL I have been coming down for a little over 30 years and still don't know if I could live there full time. I get bored and have to get off the island every once in a while. Usually once a month. My plans now are to live in the woods of Wisconsin for the summer and spend the winters down there. I love heat but it is way to hot down there during the summer and air conditioning is way to expensive. I suggest you come down for at least 6 months to test out the area. February thru July should be a good time.


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#9 TXdisgurl

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:23 PM

In regards to VA coverage from what my husband and I have found out is that the VA will cover care there if it is service connected. We are making the move in 10 days.
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#10 marlinfishing

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:37 PM

In regards to VA coverage from what my husband and I have found out is that the VA will cover care there if it is service connected. We are making the move in 10 days.

Please point me to a regulation that backs that statement.  I'm sure you're probably correct, but I'd like to read how it works in a foriegn country.  Thanks!


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#11 DebB

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:21 PM

Everyone that I know with VA medical returns to the States for treatment. Having said that, there is a VA Foreign Medical Program Guide at http://www.va.gov/ha...k-121009web.pdf

 

Likely that the US Consular office for this area -- in Merida -- would be a helpful contact to discuss the reality down here. You can find its contact info on the US Dept of State website.


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#12 marlinfishing

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:56 PM

Everyone that I know with VA medical returns to the States for treatment. Having said that, there is a VA Foreign Medical Program Guide at http://www.va.gov/ha...k-121009web.pdf

 

Likely that the US Consular office for this area -- in Merida -- would be a helpful contact to discuss the reality down here. You can find its contact info on the US Dept of State website.

Thank you!  That's what I was looking for.


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"We live in a culture of simulation, in which nothing is what it seems and the image that reigns has no reference to the real world."  (The Art Of War, Sun Tzu)  It is what it is...  THAT never changes.


#13 TXdisgurl

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 03:16 PM

http://www.va.gov/ha...ies/fmp/fmp.asp

This is what was given to us, hope it helps.
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