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Sweet Corn & Black Bean Enchiladas


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#1 marlinfishing

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 11:34 AM

I found a site on the Florida Dept. of Agricultue that has some some interesting recipes.  I decided to try this one yesterday and it was very good and pretty easy to make.  Mine didn't look as pretty as pretty as the picture, but it was a filling meal and my neighbors like it.  I didn't serve them w/avocados, but it probably would've been a nice touch.

 

Here's the link: http://www.freshfrom...Bean-Enchiladas

 

Full attribution to the site!

  Ingredients:
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 cup fresh corn kernels
  • 2 bell peppers, diced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 cup salsa, your favorite kind
  • 1 can low-sodium black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 10 (6-inch) corn tortillas
  • 2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese, divided
  • 1 can enchilada sauce
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • pan-release cooking spray
  • kosher salt to taste
  • freshly ground pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Lightly spray an 11x7-inch (2-quart) baking dish with pan-release cooking spray.
  3. Add vegetable oil to a medium pan.
  4. Cook onion, corn and bell peppers over medium high heat for 3 minutes.
  5. Add cumin, salsa and black beans and continue to cook for two minutes, stirring occasionally.
  6. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Remove pan from heat and let cool slightly.
  8. Place an even amount of the filling mixture in each of the 10 tortillas.
  9. Using 1 cup of shredded cheese, evenly distribute it on top of each of the 10 tortillas.
  10. Carefully roll up each stuffed tortilla, and place them seam side down in the sprayed baking dish.
  11. Pour the enchilada sauce over the rolled enchiladas, spreading to coat all tortillas.
  12. Sprinkle with remaining 1 cup cheese.
  13. Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until cheese is melted and sauce is bubbly around edges.
  14. Remove enchiladas from oven and let cool slightly.
  15. Serve enchiladas with diced Florida avocado, salsa and sour cream.

 


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#2 Coz2wonder

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 07:32 AM

I'm going to try this.  Will have to use frozen white corn (available at Ched's) because the corn they sell here is for cows.

 

Thanks


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#3 marlinfishing

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 05:24 PM

That's amazing to me!  I thought on an island that easy to grow plants that you would have access to fresh corn, not feed corn.  One of the reasons I made it is because I'm trying to make recipes that I think (thought) would have the majority of the ingredients on the island when we retire.  I can get fresh bi-colored ears of corn here for 3/$1 and it's sweet!  Let me know how it works for you.  Mine didn't look as pretty as the picture, but it was darn good.  Salsa was good on it, but I use salsa on everything.  Hey, maybe I could make it could make it rich growing sweet corn and selling it in the market.  Just kidding, though it's easy to grow and I need to plan on bringing good seeds w/me for in my garden for my use.  ;)


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#4 DJDiverDan

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 06:53 PM

Sweet corn, Dent corn, and Pop corn are very separate varieties of the corn plant, they are NOT interchangeable. Since Dent corn, or field corn, which you can identify by the dent or indentation on the top of a mature kernel, is the type used to make corn meal and corn tortillas, as well as for animal feed, it doesn't surprise me that Sweet corn is not readily available in Mexico. And, having grown up in west central Illinois, I can tell you that the Sweet Corn available outside of the corn belt in the midwest - Illinois, Iowa, Indiana and Ohio, where the climate and soil are nearly perfect for Sweet Corn - just can't touch the Sweet Corn from home. I've been in Texas for over 30 years now, and I've pretty much given up on locally grown Sweet Corn. Even here in Texas, I buy the flash frozen sweet corn or canned Niblets rather than the locally farm grown fresh Sweet Corn - the soil (much too alkaline) and climate (much too hot and dry) here are just not conducive to growing a good Sweet Corn.
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#5 marlinfishing

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 08:21 PM

Sweet corn, Dent corn, and Pop corn are very separate varieties of the corn plant, they are NOT interchangeable. Since Dent corn, or field corn, which you can identify by the dent or indentation on the top of a mature kernel, is the type used to make corn meal and corn tortillas, as well as for animal feed, it doesn't surprise me that Sweet corn is not readily available in Mexico. And, having grown up in west central Illinois, I can tell you that the Sweet Corn available outside of the corn belt in the midwest - Illinois, Iowa, Indiana and Ohio, where the climate and soil are nearly perfect for Sweet Corn - just can't touch the Sweet Corn from home. I've been in Texas for over 30 years now, and I've pretty much given up on locally grown Sweet Corn. Even here in Texas, I buy the flash frozen sweet corn or canned Niblets rather than the locally farm grown fresh Sweet Corn - the soil (much too alkaline) and climate (much too hot and dry) here are just not conducive to growing a good Sweet Corn.

Hi Dan, I reckon the word "sweet" is a very relative term.  Since we both live in north TX I'll send you a PM and maybe we can come to an understanding about it.  I think east TX corn is pretty "sweet", but I have only lived in Arkansas, Oklahoma & TX so I don't know about the corn belt corn.  Like I said, it's relative to your experiences.  It's all good.


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#6 CGrover

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 10:52 AM

Sweet corn, Dent corn, and Pop corn are very separate varieties of the corn plant, they are NOT interchangeable. Since Dent corn, or field corn, which you can identify by the dent or indentation on the top of a mature kernel, is the type used to make corn meal and corn tortillas, as well as for animal feed, it doesn't surprise me that Sweet corn is not readily available in Mexico. And, having grown up in west central Illinois, I can tell you that the Sweet Corn available outside of the corn belt in the midwest - Illinois, Iowa, Indiana and Ohio, where the climate and soil are nearly perfect for Sweet Corn - just can't touch the Sweet Corn from home. I've been in Texas for over 30 years now, and I've pretty much given up on locally grown Sweet Corn. Even here in Texas, I buy the flash frozen sweet corn or canned Niblets rather than the locally farm grown fresh Sweet Corn - the soil (much too alkaline) and climate (much too hot and dry) here are just not conducive to growing a good Sweet Corn.

I was going to try this with some of our MN home grown sweet corn, but I guess I might as well use frozen also, since it isn't from the corn belt.  ;)  I always thought our sweet corn, and bi-color corn was wonderful.  We don't buy sweet corn unless it is local.


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