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#1 Melbell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 07:30 AM

My husband and I are planning on moving to Cozumel, we are selling our home in Wisconsin and much of our belongings. We hope to buy a house we have had our eyes on, in which 2 spare bedrooms of the home we plan on renting to tourists for stays, much like a "Bed and Breakfast".. Question: Are there any permits ect that we would need to do this?

My husband and I plan on coming back to Wisconsin for the summer months (May-Oct), what would we need to have to live in Cozumel during the winter months? Are we able to do so with just a passport, or would we need a Visa? How does this work?

If we were to rent out the 2 spare rooms, would we have to pay a tax to Mexico to do so? This will be a source of income for us while on the island.

Are there part time jobs on the island? My husband and I are taking it easy and do not want to work full time, however would like to have a part time job. (that does not require to know Spanish, as we only know English).

I have a pet capuchin monkey, would Cozumel allow me to bring her there? Are there exotic animal vets on the island?

I am still checking with our Fed Gov if they would allow her to come back and fourth back into the states due to the Lacey Act, however she was born and bred in the USA. We go to schools and teach primate education and conservation, we also do shows and pictures in Wisconsin Dells, I thought this would be great to offer vacationers on the island...


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#2 Charles

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:02 AM

You need an attorney, big time! Your listed desires/intentions will be most complicated to arrange and I'd be surprised if you could bring a monkey into Mexico and even more surprised if you could get permitted to do shows. Yes you would be required to pay taxes on any income and for dealings with La Hacienda (Mexican IRS), picture the IRS and the complicated rules pumped up on steroids. I'd put your plans on hold until you receive serious legal advice from an attorney. It will cost to receive such advice from a competent attorney. I wouldn't sell home and liquidate possessions at this stage of the game unless that is a wish regardless.

Just a side note; Have you considered Florida?
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#3 Carey

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 05:51 PM

Bringing a monkey in is something you would really need to research.  Also completely forget forever using the monkey to put on shows for the tourists.  You would be turned in in a matter of hours for that.  Not going to happen. That's not an option for you.

 

You will have to pay taxes and monthly accounting fees to legally rent your rooms out.  And you will pay higher rates on virtually everything including electricity if you decide to hold your property in a corporation which entitles you to legally rent.  If it's in a trust it is illegal for you to rent.

 

I would suggest addressing legal questions to Gisela at cozumellawyer.com.  She speaks excellent English and can do the research you need for you.


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#4 mstevens

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 07:58 AM

If it's in a trust it is illegal for you to rent.

 

According to our lawyer, Gisela Rodriguez, that is not the case. She says there are no laws about renting property based on who owns it (individual, corporation, or trust). Some trusts are written to permit the beneficiary to rent the property or to use it for work (e.g., as an office) and others are written to forbid any but pure residential use. If the trust allows it and all other requirements are met (residency status that permits economic activity, collection and payment of taxes, proper accounting, etc.) then she says a property held under fideicomiso can be rented out. In no even should someone even be thinking of this without a lawyer.


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#5 Carey

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 08:43 AM

Well, that is news to me indeed re the ability to have a notario write up a trust document that allows commercial activity. I have never seen or heard of this before so either it is new or, more likely, they always did it their own way on Cozumel and the standard route was to prohibit commercial activity on property held in a fidiecomiso.

 

If you are buying a property held in a fidi, best check out what you will be inheriting.  Because it is my understanding that you can sell an exisiting property and just transfer the document along with the property into the new owners hands.  In which case, and if you want to rent, have a lawyer comb over the fidi that comes with and pay the extra required to have it dissolved and a new one made up if it doesn't suit.

 

One good thing down here -- lawyers fees are WAAY less than in the US.  So this kind of work will probably not break your bank.

 

I continue to question, however, how you could rent a property without declaring it a business.  And it was my understanding which obviously may be incorrect at this point withe new tax law changes of early 2014, that the way the tax man in Mexico, Hacienda, keeps track of money-making foreigners is via monitoring the details of their corporation's activity.

 

If you don't have a corporation, not sure how that would work as in what is the mechanism for reporting income including the Mexican I.V.A. tax.

 

If you can get more specific info on this particular issue from Gisela, that would be helpful to many.

 

The monkey?  You'd have to check on both sides of the border re bringing it in and out and you'd better check with the airlines as well to see if they'll allow it as an in cabin pet!  If the monkey comes in as cargo, which on some airlines is the only way they'll allow pets to fly in the hold, you will be looking at dealing with high customs/aduana fees every time you enter Mexico.  And I'm talking $350 to $1000 US fees unless they've started regulating the aduanas a little better which maybe they have by this time. 

 

 

Re doing shows with the monkey, that would require a lot of research and the proper documentation and permissions which could take a long time to get -- if you ever did.  So don't count on that source of income any time soon.  Because Mexicans will turn you in in a New York Minute out of jealousy the second they see you are making money. 


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#6 sandfeet

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 08:10 PM

Help ive never been or posted on a site. The only place in the world that comforts me has been cozumel. Im emotionally lost. Im 54 single educated female. I want to escape and heal in Cozumel. Can anyone help me figure out how to live there for however long?
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#7 van2coz

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 03:56 PM

Another thing to consider is the recent posting in Yucalandia regarding the changes to temporary residents with working visas (bold text is from Yucalandia):

 

http://yucalandia.co...l-visa-holders/

“Last month, June 2015, immigration circulated an internal update to their offices with changes to how they would treat renewals for people who have work permits. There was no change in the current immigration law or its regulations. This change was made at the whim of higher-ups in immigration.

This change will apply to people who did not originally enter Mexico with an offer of employment work visa and will only apply to those who entered with a regular temporary visa and who later changed to a visa with permission to work. People renewing work visas obtained which were changed from temporary visas will be required to submit bank statements to prove that they either have income from outside Mexico or savings that meet the published Residente Temporal guidelines (400 times minimum wage or 28.040 pesos for income or 20,000 minimum wage or 1,402,000 pesos in assets.

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