Jump to content


Photo

Atm's Under Attack In Mexico


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 WildBill

WildBill

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:65 Miles South of Houston
  • Interests:Snorkeling, Photography, Writing, Traveling

Posted 14 September 2015 - 05:49 PM

Read this article. Might be walking into the bank to do my transfers after all!

 

http://krebsonsecuri...gang-in-mexico/

 

WildBill


  • 0

#2 DJDiverDan

DJDiverDan

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 263 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sunnyvale, Texas
  • Interests:Scuba Diving, economics, Politics, Libertarian. And eating great food (usually to excess!)

Posted 15 September 2015 - 12:16 PM

It seems that this type of ATM Fraud can be detected by anyone with a smart phone. Before using any ATM, simply turn on your cell phone, turn on Bluetooth, and scan for a Bluetooth signal. If the ATM you are standing in front of is emitting a Bluetooth signal of any kind, it is almost certainly hacked - put your card away, move on, and look for another machine. And, if you feel like a good Samaritan, put a big sign on the ATM warning others that it's a scam.
  • 0

#3 WildBill

WildBill

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:65 Miles South of Houston
  • Interests:Snorkeling, Photography, Writing, Traveling

Posted 15 September 2015 - 12:43 PM

I believe that is a good start when going to an ATM now. BUT, this is only the first chess move in a long game. The hackers have made a few mistakes that enable us to identify the signal coming from the ATM. The next round is they change the signal or the signals title coming from the blue tooth device, change the device or change the technology involved in the hack. For those of us without a cheap smartphone bought in Mexico (like the one used in the article, the writers apple (iPhone 5) didn't detect the Bluetooth device) we are out of luck. The next round of hacks will be more difficult to detect because the hackers have learned from this. But when money is involved they will quickly come up with a new scheme and adapt if there isn't another one already in use or sitting on the shelf ready to go.

I wonder how the new cards being issued in the US (with a chip embedded) will effect hacking?

One thing is for sure, I cant wait for the part II installment of the article that is coming soon where the writer hits Carmen, Tulum and Cozumel.

What we ought to do is find an expat on the island and hit all the ATMs with a smartphone, and post a big sign on the ATMs that says HACKED DO NOT USE. And post the locations of the hacked machines on here or Trip Advisor or Facebook. You know, do an A Team Scheme. We have to protect our little piece of paradise.
  • 0

#4 lss96

lss96

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Interests:Diving

Posted 15 September 2015 - 01:35 PM

I agree with the previous comment.  I live in Cozumel for 4 months like many others I use the ATM machines.  I am hoping the ATM's at the Banks are safer, that is what I normally use.  Having said that I only have a cheap Mexican phone while there.  I do hope if residents who have phones with blue tooth scan the ATM's and Post the scammed ATM's on this site that would be great.


  • 0

#5 mstevens

mstevens

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 852 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Hampshire and Cozumel
  • Interests:Diving, Ducatis, Dorkdom

Posted 15 September 2015 - 04:16 PM

Chip-and-PIN cards are harder to hack, but there are already effective attacks for these that seem to rely on bad security decisions that allow an "unpredictable number" to be predicted. 


  • 0

#6 Eileen

Eileen

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 16 September 2015 - 07:17 AM

Does anybody think the issue is the combined VISA/Debit cards that are prevalent in the US?  In Canada, I have a debit card that only has access to my selected bank accounts and a separate VISA. These combined cards would seem to be more of a risk.  Both my debit and VISA cards have chips and PINs, but I know that any level of security will eventually be hacked.  I guess, in the meantime, I'll be bringing cash when I come in November, and if the need arises, I'll be going to a Scotiabank branch to get a cash advance on my Scotiabank VISA.  Let's hope that when he publishes the next installment, that the situation on Cozumel is not as bad.


  • 0

#7 mstevens

mstevens

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 852 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Hampshire and Cozumel
  • Interests:Diving, Ducatis, Dorkdom

Posted 16 September 2015 - 09:12 AM

I don't think the funding source for a card has anything to do with how hackable it is. I do think that there's a bigger problem when every bit of someone's bank account can be siphoned off as opposed to some limit set by either a credit card issuer or the customer.


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users