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Us Notary On Cozumel Or Playa Del C?

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#1 Pitboss

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 05:45 PM

Anyone know of a US notary on Cozumel or in Playa D C?


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#2 cvchief

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 06:18 PM

Isn't there someone at Rockin Java that is a TX notary?


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#3 Carey

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 09:40 PM

 Yes, Lisa, owner of Rock n' Java, has her notary license and stamp.  The times we've used her services we just gave her money for a donation to the humane society.  She's a founding member of that organization.  I don't have her contact info but anyone at the restaurant can tell you how to get in touch and she's also there a lot.


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#4 DebB

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 06:29 AM

I am throwing a caution for additional understanding. I am also a state's notary. A notary public may only authorize signatures for documents executed within the state that commissioned him. Outside the geographical boundaries of that state, the notary has no jurisdiction.

 

For notarizations abroad, a US person has only two choices for best acceptance of important documents. One is to use a US Embassy or Consul notary who is commissioned to act for all states. This service is available in Playa del Carmen and it is not cheap. The other option is for a person who is in military service, in which case an officer may notarize his signature.


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#5 cvchief

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 01:50 PM

Yea, I believe it is completely illegal, but depending on your need, that may suffice.   :P


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#6 obispo

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 06:22 AM

It definitely is illegal. In most jurisdictions it is cause to have one's notary commission revoked. Not to mention that the notarization is invalid. The consulate in Merida charges $50 USD. If it's
important, why take a chance of being caught?

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#7 Carey

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 12:37 PM

Well, after 12 years in crazy little Cozumel I don't bat an eye at illegal if it gets the job done and there's no one you'll be called on it.  I don't think I'd buy a house witht those documents however.  (Je Je).

 

Deb writes: "For notarizations abroad, a US person has only two choices for best acceptance of important documents. One is to use a US Embassy or Consul notary who is commissioned to act for all states. This service is available in Playa del Carmen and it is not cheap. The other option is for a person who is in military service, in which case an officer may notarize his signature."

 

And I'm wondering whether the military service applies to someone from any country in which case you might be able to get a naval officer or even the Capi of the Port to sign it.  You'd have to pay a translator.  But that shore beats a ?? $200 RT to Merida on Maya Air or a cheap but rather lengthy ferry and bus ride there and back.

 

Nope -- This page lays it all out:  http://members.usnot...asp?AssetID=430

 

And a US commissioned officer is only allowed to witness/notarize documents from other military personnel.  Civilians cannot receive this service.  Another option -- grab a cheap RT to FLL or MIA.  Do a little shopping while you're there.


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#8 cvchief

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 12:45 PM

Well I bet most of the docs, YOU don't care if they are notarized, only the people you are sending to care.


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#9 Coz2wonder

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 02:09 PM

it only matters if it is a state, or fed document in the US.

 

Is the Playa office even open?  Did they get somebody (who works from home) in Cozumel?

 

Otherwise, nobody cares.


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#10 El Graduado

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 09:27 AM

 

Otherwise, nobody cares.

Unless you (or the document's recipient) need to have the illegally-notarized document apostilled in the future.  That would present a problem.


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#11 cvchief

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 09:29 PM

Unless you (or the document's recipient) need to have the illegally-notarized document apostilled in the future.  That would present a problem.

 

But you probably could get it declare apostate....


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