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Im interested in Moving Back to Cozumel


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#1 Ronnie Heinz

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 08:07 AM

Hello, I lived in Cozumel several years ago and I loved it but my wife got a little cultural shocked. I would like to move back down there but I would prefer to get a job there before I move this time. Are there many jobs available there. I may also very interested into opening a small smokehouse business. Smoking ribs, chicken, ect...Thank You
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#2 Coz2wonder

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 02:24 PM

at first stroke the answer to "are there any jobs here" the answer is...NO.

During high season, maybe working for DI as a sales persons...

But, lets take your second through...Opening a Smokehouse.

What I would be willing to pay for is a REAL Smokehouse BBQ, with really good smoked beef, baby back ribs, chicken and pork.

If you would also do Brisket, as well as Turkeys, then I could see an upscale business.

I would also add to the Smoke-shop...a Deli. Where you could buy sliced beef, and purchase ribs cooked, as well as the BBQ sauces to go along.

What about some great Kielbasa, and some great breads and rolls...

Now, that would be an outstanding business.
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#3 artgirl

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 04:02 PM

This is the first time Išve ever drooled... literally... while reading a post.
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#4 Coz2wonder

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 04:18 PM

Guess I was hungry, and wishing I could get some REALLY good BBQ food, and meats...

I really miss Beef on Wick (Kimmelwick bun, with sea salt crystals on top)...Philly Cheese steaks, Fresh ground sirloin, oh, how about PRIME RIB...even POT ROAST...

I guess what I would love is a really good butcher, with grain feed beef and livestock...
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#5 nauticab

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 08:50 PM

paula, you have the land. maybe you can come up with a deal with this guy? you supply the meat and you have unlimited cuts and BBQ!

i'd be willing to buy from such an establishment.
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#6 Ronnie Heinz

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 09:49 PM

a 16 hour of cooked melt in your mouth brisket it what I do best.
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#7 Ronnie Heinz

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 09:50 PM

wanna be my partner
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#8 Coz2wonder

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 08:26 AM

Nauticab, our covenant in Mariposa Estates do not permit any commercial businesses...thank goodness.

Also, I would hate to wake up every morning drooling to the delicious smells. Okay, so most mornings I wake up drooling, but that's a condition I have...age!

Ronnie, sorry but will give my ideas away freely, for a hamburger today...

Cozumel has has some unique needs, and wants based of the diverse population here.

A meat market recently opened, good news. Except, it was the same old tough meats you can buy in the grocery stores here...The bad news.

If it where me, I would put together a brief business plan. I would list out the possibilities, and the risks. I would check costs of rent, as well as the type of equipment you would need to start.

In addition, the best meats are available from a Cancun wholesaler, who does deliver to the island. I would check the cost of the type of product you want to sell, and if it is available.

Also, I would contact (in person, after you have flushed out the above) high end restaurants that you could wholesale to as well. Then don't forget about catering, and franchise opportunities as part of your overall business plan.

Is the concept feasible, anything is possible, but is it practical?
What are the financial limitations, and expectations?

Not only will you need to invest in the business aspect, but you will also need to consider your living expenses while establishing your business.

Lots of business have started with a simple need being met. Not much planning, and a lot of hard work, and luck...

I do wish you much luck, cuz I'd be a customer.
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#9 Linkslady

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 02:40 PM

My hubby makes killer smoked baby back ribs.. we brought our smoker down as "diving equipment" :)
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#10 Charles

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 10:01 PM

Ronnie, before further consideration of opening a business, get a good idea what rules and regulations you would be required to operate as a foreigner. It can be brutal in operating a Mexican corporation, high taxes and very complicating accounting and reporting required.

To expand on the earlier reply, your job options are pretty much limited to diamond jewelry sales or possibly working in time share sales. Basic salary might be about $500 dollars per MONTH, working six day weeks, 8-10 hour days. Realistically it requires two salaries to live frugal lives and quite an adjustment in the lifestyle. If you can't embrace the culture and happily live as Mexican do, it is not an easy adaptation.
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#11 Ronnie Heinz

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 08:29 AM

Thank you all very much for your advice and encouragement. Locally I cook the meat at home and then place it in stores throughout the town and give them a percentage or they outright buy the smoked meat and charge whatever they want after that. What do you think about that for starters instead of going full throttle and investing in a big business? Thank You
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#12 Charles

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:30 AM

Reality check time. For a foreigner to conduct business activities, you have to form a Mexican corporation. No it is not a simple U.S. style S corporation, full blown corporation which will require a mind boggling array of accounting and be subject to high tax rates. Dealing with a food product, especially cooked meat, will involve a host of health related permits, inspections and the whole matter of zoning restrictions.

Your product could well be superior to the dozens of Mexican owned and operated shops and home based small businesses, but they have an entirely different set of business rules and regulations. How many of the successful small businesses could survive two months if they were required to operate under the regulations with you must comply.

My out of the air, ball park guess would be $5,000 dollars required to do the paper work required just to get a business formed on paper. Then comes the fun, zoning restrictions, all the equipment necessary, making the contacts necessary to buy and sell your product and I hope you'd be 100% fluent in Spanish.

What you might be able to do at home in North America, simply can not be done here. It would be like trying to open a small mom and pop store at home and targeting the customers of Walmart. In order to sell a product at a profit, you'd have to sell at a substantially higher price than all your competition. They would not have all the additional restrictions, the much higher taxation and all the additional burdens placed on a foreign owned business. You would be competing with people who had contacts and connections which span generations.

Once again, sorry to rain on your parade. If your wife had cultural shock the last time, is she no longer in the picture and or could she adapt better to living on her own as you work 85-90 hour weeks.

You wanted to have a job lined up before your arrival, simply can't realistically be done. Work permits would need to be processed after your arrival and again, figure a good starting wage of around $500 dollars monthly working six day weeks. Diamonds or time share, choose your poison.

I'd suggest an opening budget of about $50,000 dollars to get started and it would be well to have $100K back up and of course, this would be a gamble, so I wouldn't suggest risking money you couldn't afford to lose. "High season" lasts about three months, you'd need to make about 80% of your income in that time frame.
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#13 Coz2wonder

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 02:30 PM

All the input that Charles has stated is the reality, but without a plan of attack you will never know.

The realities of the Island are that you do need cash. To rent, to purchase, let alone start a business.

But, you will never known all of these things unless you ask the question(s).

If you need a job first, then you are going to be very limited on opportunities here...that's the reality.

I rented a furnished 2bd (1 story) house way back on 65 for $500 bucks a month. The A/C bill was double that...

Everybody wants to escape here, but frankly, it takes some a lot of bucks...

But, you do have foreigners, businessmen, and women, Nauticab, as an example who sold flip flops to boat captains out of her backpack, and now has a business here, and home.

It can be done.
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#14 Ronnie Heinz

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 03:08 PM

----- Dang Im really wanting to move back down there but it just doesnt seem a reality right now. Last time I had a lot of money and didnt need to work.. This times its not the case. And yes, unfortunately my wife recently left me without any notice after 13 years so I wanted to do something drastic and this was it. Another dream possibly lost. Thanks for all your input. If you have or know of any job openings please keep me in mind. Please help me fullfil at least this dream.. Take Care
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#15 nauticab

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 09:55 PM

yep, here i am to put in a word or two. or more :)
i have been thru several types of ownership with my business. i had a small business permit before they stopped giving them to foreigners. then decided to get an SA de CV (which later found out was really not necessary). my accounting stuff was not that difficult. you pay an accountant $2500 to $3000 pesos a month, give him all your receipts and income docs, and he figures out the payment. it is all done online now, much quicker and simpler. just like stateside, a good accountant is a creative accountant and can help keep your taxes low. then i went back to small business (was naturalized and mexicans can get this easily) as the tax rate and accountant rate is lower and i could get my importers license.
anyway, yeah i started with a backpack, and you could start with a local to get the "meat" out to the locals.
an option, and it would have to be one thought out with a lot of trust in a national (born or naturalized) and thinking small, is to start a small business with this person, with you being a partner (socio) or perhaps for immigration purposes, an employee. a small business is FREE to start with the hacienda. licenses will run a couple hundred dollars a year. health permits are not that hard, as long as you get the rules and follow them. i have friends who have done just that. the most important thing, if you go this route, is to think of all the possible outcomes, including business failure, to make sure your assets are clear. while you may not be legally a socio (not sure of the rules), you can have a separate binding contract done by a lawyer to protect you both. make sure the socio is investing something too, whether it's his land or property if you have the equipment for example.

your venture CAN be done. you need to be creative and think out of the box and really research your options. think simple.... not a sit down smoke house, but a kitchen that you sell from or do deliveries. you will pay less rent, have less employees, can make your own hours, etc. and can start small enough to make some money but future thinking for later expansion, like catering, where you can simply contract the extra help.

and while the "high season" comments do ring true, if you get the locals eating your food, you will have a lower season but everyone needs to eat. the trick is to get some tourist traffic but DEPEND on the locals to help you bring home some money.

there are some very experienced folks on this board who have done the corporations and small businesses, and some have succeeded and others sadly failed. i guess i can be named the optimistic one. but you HAVE TO THINK out of the box. if your dream is to do this BBQ, you already have some potential customers here. get a few locals drooling, and you are in.

you could silently start. i silently started with the sandals in my backpack. i did not have my business license. i was under an FM3 to be a snorkel guide and dive master. but i sold out of my house. built my business enough that when i had people coming over at all hours to buy them, i realized i needed to make this formal and i did. 2 months later had a store front and never looked back. was it legal in the beginning? no. did i MAKE it legal and succeed through intelligent marketing? yep. when i opened my doors, i had about $2000usd worth of merchandise. little by little.

the people, in my opinion, who splurge $50,000usd in a business without doing the proper marketing and thinking things thru, are the ones who fail. you need to be "hungry" here to make this kind of business work, literally and figuratively. it can be done, please dont let all the "reality checks", while they have some merit, turn you off.
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Cabrilla's Sport Center
Calle 11 % Melgar y 10av
Edificio Portales, Local 1
Dressing Fishermen and Triathletes from Head to Toe

#16 mike_s

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 08:50 PM

I think Czm needs a BBQ joint for sure. I know you would be able to get the pork that will need. Not to sure where you would source the Briskets, In all my years I have never seen one on the island. Maybe Sams Club? Wish you all the luck in the world bro. Some pix from this weekends smoke session here in TX ;o)

Brisket and a Pork Butt
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Sliced Brisket
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Chopped Brisket
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Pulled Pork
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#17 Coz2wonder

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 08:19 AM

Mike, that was just MEAN....you could have at least made the pictures "scratch and sniff".

I want a Brisket in my basket!
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#18 cozumelwantabe

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 11:27 PM

Not only is that mean but now I have to go change my shirt from drooling all over the place...
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