Jump to content


Photo

Looking for a long term rental


  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#1 whisperer

whisperer

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 13 February 2010 - 03:32 PM

I'm interested in a long term rental. According to some local sources, there are many places to rent on the island right now but I don't know the best place to find these rentals that exist. I have been a property manager for several years so I believe a property owner could bypass that expense and work directly with me and have good peace of mind. I'm also familiar with the island and the issues home owners deal with.
If anyone knows of a resource to find homes for rent on the island, please contact me. Here are the things I would require;
3 bedrooms or more
2 baths or more
Swimming pool-any size
Air conditioning
Good security

I think that covers what I'm looking for. I'm probably missing some important element in which case, anyone is welcome to bring it to my attention.

Thanks for the help...
Kate [/size][/size][/size]
  • 0

#2 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 13 February 2010 - 06:14 PM

Kate:

What area do you want to live in?

What is your budget?

How long do you want to rent for?

Do you speak Spanish?

If you are renting from a local, they do their own property management.

If you are renting from a foreigner, you would have to have quite a bit of knowledge on paying bills, and who and where you can get repairs made.

As a property manager, your expected to be able to repair yourself, or be able to fix it fast, and cheap.

To be a "property manager" your working documents (FM3) need to be in order, and reflect what business you are conducting. Therefore, you need to have a business. That is $3,000 usd's to set that up.

That's the reality..

Also,our electric runs us $350usd's per month. That's with little air running in the summer.

I hope you find what your looking for.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#3 whisperer

whisperer

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 13 February 2010 - 09:36 PM

thank you for the fast reply.

What area do you want to live in?> I am flexible as far as location goes. As long as the home is secure.

What is your budget?> Cleanliness and neatness are important to me. Rather then coming with a budget, I would like to know what the costs are for what I require. I know someone on the island who has a 4 bedroom with a pool, furnished nicely. It's a large house and they pay $750.00 per month.

How long do you want to rent for? >I am willing to sign a 9 to 12 month lease if the price is right.

Do you speak Spanish?> Very little but I seem to get around pretty good sometimes with the help of friends.

If you are renting from a local, they do their own property management.> That's understandable.

If you are renting from a foreigner, you would have to have quite a bit of knowledge on paying bills, and who and where you can get repairs made.> I am capable of taking care of all bills including the owners fidi if needed. As far as repairs go, Cozumel can be frustrating for most everyone I know in that arena. I have a list of people who do all different kinds of repairs.

As a property manager, your expected to be able to repair yourself, or be able to fix it fast, and cheap. > I can handle small repairs but the owner would have to be responsible for the cost of repairs that would logically would be the owners responsibility. As far as "cheap" I'm always looking for the best deal I can find but I take into consideration the quality of the repair as well as the cost.

I hope that clarifies my post. Thank you for your input.

Kate

To be a "property manager" your working documents (FM3) need to be in order, and reflect what business you are conducting. Therefore, you need to have a business. That is $3,000 usd's to set that up.> I'm not looking to be a property manager, I was just saying I have been managing property for many years. I don't want to do it as a business, it is just to give the property owner peace of mind that I can handle the needs of the property myself. That shouldn't require me to reflect myself as running a business, would it? It is not at all what I'm looking to do for work. My FM3 would be for a completely different type of business and I may not run any kind of business initially.

That's the reality..

Also,our electric runs us $350usd's per month. That's with little air running in the summer.> Thank you, I do know the electricity is expensive in Cozumel, hence the need for the pool...lol.

I hope you find what your looking for.
  • 0

#4 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 14 February 2010 - 07:14 AM

You have a good grip on the realities here, so your way ahead of the game.

I would start pulling up some real estate website for Cozumel. A couple of agencies do rentals. Also, there are property managers who also do long term rentals that may have something available for you.

You can pull the URL's up like typing into Google, "property management, cozumel", or "real estate, cozumel".

That will give you a starting place.

Also, with a friend here who is already renting, perhaps they would be willing to take a look around for you. There are tons of signs up "for rent" and they may find something just by driving around.

Hope that helps.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#5 whisperer

whisperer

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 15 February 2010 - 01:58 PM

Thanks again.
I don't know about a good grip...lol. But I seem to be able to make things work when I'm in question about what to do. Does anyone have an idea as to how much places are renting for there? In terms of what I'm looking for anyway. Just because my friends have found a place at such a good price I don't know if that is a good indicator of what I could expect to find. I will contact some of the places you suggested I was just hoping to get an idea of what to expect so I know how much I should actually expect to pay.

Happy Monday,
Kate
  • 0

#6 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 16 February 2010 - 12:09 AM

A forum member posted back in October/November with a place that fit what you are looking for and in that budget range. I thought about it, but for us a pool is a negative. I might use it in the hot summer months, but the water is generally far too cold for me to swim in a pool seven months of the year. I wouldn't want to deal with the maintenance involved in having a pool. So the pool was a deal killer for us that otherwise might have been considered.

It ain't easy finding the right place that meets everything you want, the right price and location, but they do exist. Renting a place with a pool will cost more. You or the owner will either be paying for a maintenance person (or do it yourself) and then running the pump daily for the filter will add to the electricity bill. Prices vary wildly, they are some good values, there are fair market prices and then those that are dreaming and hope to rent for even higher prices to make up for the months of no rentals.

There is a real glut in places that the owners hoped for weekly rentals which would bring profits. LOL Years back a forum member posted something for rent that people thought was a misprint. He was offering a nice rental for $500 monthly that he used to rent (or try) in the $800 a week range. In confirming the price he said he was sick of dealing with the hassle, property management fees and wanted a simple low term rental that didn't need maid service three times a week. Only a few people make money on rentals, some manage to break even, others bleed money that they hoped to produce income. You might find someone that wants to change gears and go for a long term rental. The place I rented last year was built to be a B&B or daily or weekly rental in the $100 a night range. The owner had changed his mind about this idea before he finished construction.

Corpus Christi neighborhood is full of places with pools for sale or weekly rentals. Many were never the income producers that people had imagined. Might not be the best neighborhood with regard to vandalism and vacant house break ins, but the neighborhood, "Gringo Gulch" is marketed as the highly desired, best, most sought after neighborhood.
  • 0

#7 whisperer

whisperer

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 17 February 2010 - 12:57 AM

well when you do the math, $500 per mo. minus management fee's, monthly up keep etc...can end up making much more sense in the long run and even the short run for that matter. My hope is that someone who has something will see my post, or someone who knows someone..or however it ends up working. :) Meanwhile I am of course looking at other resources to find what I need. My guess is after the high season there will be many more motivated people.
I'm glad the island is doing better this year. Last year was worry sum.
  • 0

#8 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 21 February 2010 - 12:27 PM

The other day I stopped at the XOXO...and right next door is Villas Mayaluum. http://www.mayaluum.net/

The sign on the building, and in their website states that they do long term rentals. They also have 3 bedroom apartments.

It is in a great location (right next to Papa Hogs) and a great beach area, and bar.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#9 nauticab

nauticab

    Guru

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,940 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cozumel

Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:46 PM

i always jump in here when i read folks like paula who have electric bills at $200usd to $350usd a month. it truly is a comfort issue. mine are 265 pesos every TWO months for a 2br home and i suspect when i have the 2nd floor done, it may go up to 350pesos every two months. i don't have nor need air conditioning. some people do. when i had a mini a/c, the power bill went up by 200 pesos in two months time, running it in the evenings for about 10 to 12 hours for the bedroom. i can't and probably will never understand how anyone, other than the ridiculous jewelry stores that air condition the street, can have such high a/c bills. but that's me.

obviously construction materials and lot location as well as window placement will play major roles in how cool your home is. i know of very large homes (3000-3500sq ft) here that have no a/c and the home was architecturally built to have hot air escape up and out the stairs to the roof. fans do the job enough to keep comfortable. styrofoam bovedillas on the roof reduce heat drastically.

so to save on power bills while choosing a home, look for north facing lots with few southwestern facing windows (mayaluum living rooms and kitchens will be BOILING in the summer afternoons but bedrooms should be ok in the mornings), 220 electrical installations, good window ventilation, and consider not having a pool and just using the big one we all have short distance to our homes, and it's free. :)
  • 0
Cabrilla's Sport Center
Calle 11 % Melgar y 10av
Edificio Portales, Local 1
Dressing Fishermen and Triathletes from Head to Toe

#10 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 22 February 2010 - 10:28 AM

Can't disagree with any of Nauticab's points, specificly the point about the direction of the sun is very helpful.

I seldom run my air, but we do have big pool pumps. But, even though I don't like the big bills, I also want my creature comforts. You play, you pay.

Two key things when renting or buying/building that I would look for is; does the place have mini-splits, and blinds?

I rented a house in town on 65 & 7 with huge trees all around it, single story. I didn't realize it at the time, but the place had window air conditioners. Needless to say, I could have bought a business for the SHOCK I received on my electric bill.

The only thing I know about the place I provided the url for is the location is GREAT, newer construction, and nothing blocking your ocean view, and they all had window blinds.

With the ocean breeze, not being in a closed in area (such as streets, and houses all around to hold the heat in it would be somewhat better (you would think).

If it has mini-spits (it is fairly new construction) then you use the units when you need more comfort.

I would look for mini-spits, blinds and ceiling fans not matter where you are looking.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#11 Coz_Aholic

Coz_Aholic

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 733 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cozumel, Mexico
  • Interests:Travel, Diving, Fishing, and of course FAMILY!

    Author of Cozumel The Complete Guide II

Posted 26 February 2010 - 01:07 AM

Nauti I am so glad you posted what you did. Daniel and I live in an OLD mexican home built in the early 60s, we do not have glass windows, and the wooden louvers need to be repaired, as we do leak out some AC. It is 2 bedrooms and the rooms are VERY large, plus large kitchen, dining room and living room. The highest Elec bill for 2 months that we have had in 3 years was 2,200 pesos for 64 days. Those 2 months we were running AC in both bedrooms from about 4 in the afternoon until sometime between 8 and 10 in the morning. The next highest was 1200 pesos. Our regular bills without AC, or just using it a few hours runs between 250 and 700 pesos for 2 months. I always wondered why some Expats with NEW homes built much better, but some no bigger than mine, have such high bills.
  • 0

#12 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 February 2010 - 02:05 AM

I've had $250 peso bills and I have had $3,000 pesos bills. I can remember in the old days when our bills jumped from about $35 pesos to $55 for two months and the whole neighborhood was up in arms over the increase.

There are all kinds of factors involved; the construction materials that retain heat, poor energy efficiency of appliances and a BIG difference was just how much your meter was registering in accordance of actually use. I know of people that purchased special meters that were guaranteed to cut your bills in half. It got to me one time waiting in line to pay a $3,000 pesos bill when the person ahead of me was from a jewelry store was paying $8,000 at the commercial rate, their halogen lights were of enough watts to be seen from outer space, they had five times the square footage, the entire front was open to the western sun and they kept the store near frigid. They may have had a bill 2 1/2 times mine, but there was no way they were not using 15 times the electricity I was consuming and as commercial, they should have been paying an even higher rate per kilowatt.

We had a bedroom that the AC was so cold you had to get under blankets, but after six hours of operation, to turn it off after midnight, you were sweating bullets within five minutes. We changed that one quickly.

The new construction materials make a huge difference. Last year was the first I experienced those and even on a hot day with direct sun, the walls inside remained cool. We only used the AC a few times and for only a few hours.

The rates have gotten a lot cheaper for high consumption DAC and the allowable consumption separating residential subsidized rate of 1B to DAC are far more liberal, they doubled the monthly average and average over 12 months it seems instead of six months as before. Some are wasteful, but you might be surprised at how extreme measures at lowering usage, bad suffering and still high rates. Carey is one that avoids AC and one place we had that could generate $3,000 peso bills, Carey wouldn't want to come inside and visit while the AC was on as it was still too hot. So many places have no cross ventilation and the heat retention from the roof and walls are such that it is still getting hotter inside at midnight.

It is virtually impossible to use AC sparingly and not be looking at $2,000 pesos unless you have new construction materials or are blessed with one of the many faulty meters that work in your favor. The jefe at CFE told me he was shocked at the electricity that was metered out compared to what was recorded in billing.
  • 0

#13 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 26 February 2010 - 10:35 AM

Patricia, the point you are missing is not the size of the house (however the materials that Nauticab has used, does make a difference)it is also the amenities.

My power drain comes the following items;

220 pool pump
Jacuzzi pump (heater is propane)
Washer and Dryer
Septic Pump
Water Pump
Refrigerator (I have two)
Central air conditioner
Water Filtration system
Water softener system
TV

The ceiling fans, lights, and computer take little power.

So, if you do not have that type of infrastructure to compare with, of course your going to have low CFE bills.

For me, I wanted, and could not imagine living without what I deem a minimum standards of living. That being the case, then I have to pay for it.

Let me make one assumption, and that is that you rent the house you are living in. Even at a low rent of $250 a month plus your CFE bill, I don't think we are very far apart on costs per month bases.

It is simply how the costs are distributed.

So, now you don't have to wonder any longer...you have your answer to your question.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#14 Charles

Charles

    Guru

  • Members
  • 3,143 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 February 2010 - 12:30 PM

I have lived pretty bare-bones, more primitive than most could imagine and still have had my share of $3,000 pesos electric bills. Washer and Dryer, for ten years I used my home made Mexican washing machine, a paint bucket and drain plunger and clothes were dried on the roof or on the clothes line in the extra room. Electric water heaters turned on briefly only during cold months, during summer months never used and minimal AC in one room. The first thing I have always done is to check new rentals by turning off all power and see if there is still any movement in the meter. Some people by luck have one of those magic meters or rent a place that someone installed diversion wiring and ran much of their electricity around the meter. Some people may have a place that long ago an addition was wired into the neighbor's meter. You always should check and make sure your neighbor's house is not tied into your meter. If you are happy with your low electric bills, best not to question or pass judgment that others may not be more conservation minded than you. You just might be lucky and not know the reason why. Someone has to make up part of the 40% shortfall in electrical use and billing.

Paula, it helps some people have lower bills if they travel a lot. You'd still have your pool and other stuff, but if your house didn't have occupants, that would surely lower the costs. I can understand your costs for your choices. What I don't understand is how unbelievable many people find high electric bills when the owners take extreme measures to economize and have minimal equipment. It used to be impossible to use AC even occasionally for a few hours at a time and not be looking at $1,500 pesos.
  • 0

#15 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 26 February 2010 - 12:54 PM

Charles, your correct. If we were not here everyday, the bill would be somewhat smaller, but not by much. But, I would be spending that or more on a property manager.

And, I have checked to see if somebody else was tapped into our power source. Nope, it's just us power hogs.

When we have been FORCED to use the air, like Patricia we only use it late in the afternoon, but by 10pm, life is much better.

To run the air adds about $100usd's to the bill.

We need to switch out the central air to mini-splits and I think that will drop the bill (after you wait a few years to recover the cost of purchase) Which is something that a renter needs to think about. If there are window AC, watch the meter spin.

These CFE bills have created hardships. But, when you factor in everything, low taxes, low rents (or no mortgage)then it's not so bad.

When I lived in Ca. my taxes where $5 grand a year. Then the mortgage, then the transportation, then the fuel, insurance, on, and on, on...If you compare that to Cozumel/Mexico it's not so bad, some call it a bargain!

But, bargain is a relative term. You still have to pay your way, You still have to make sacrifices.

Ah, if money just drops from the sky, I would be out there with a BIG BUTT BUCKET!
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#16 mslf500

mslf500

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 875 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Richmond, VA & Cozumel, MX
  • Interests:Snow boarding, Diving, Spearfishing, Driving Formula Cars really fast, Mountain biking.

Posted 26 February 2010 - 01:59 PM

Speaking of electricity, does CFE have a "demand" charge on their power? That is, do they charge more per kW during certain times of the day when the demand for power is higher?

I have given thought to changing our water heater out to an instantaneous one to save energy. However, the power companies don't like them as they can draw as much as 20,000 watts at any time. If the new electronic meters have a demand feature, your bill skyrockets.
  • 0

www.CozumelCondominium.com
Nah Ha 602

#17 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 26 February 2010 - 02:25 PM

from what I know, they do not have a demand peak, like they do in the US.

You pay so much for the first 600 KWH, (lowest rate, which I think is 1p's per kwh) then they go UP per every 200kw's used. Each additional 200kwh used is at a higher scale.

Our bill was for 1800kwh's for two months.
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#18 Coz_Aholic

Coz_Aholic

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 733 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cozumel, Mexico
  • Interests:Travel, Diving, Fishing, and of course FAMILY!

    Author of Cozumel The Complete Guide II

Posted 26 February 2010 - 02:59 PM

Paula, I would guess that it must be your pool that is the killer and maybe the central AC.

We have a mini split and a thru the wall unit, and I was suprized to see that each draws about the same, as we have tested them. Other than that we are pretty equal, washer/dryer,usually 2 TVs running at night, and 2 computers. I had a gas hot water heater installed and that may also help as my propane runs 308 pesos about every 90 days.

Even tho I sometimes travel there is almost always someone here, Usually Daniel, sometimes my family or other friends. I belong to a hospitality organization and I have guests staying with me quite often, otherwise my bill would be even lower. I just wonder, because I must admit that this house is definitly not built with the modern economical construction supplies. My room is horrible by 4 pm as it faces the sun and has no shade, so it takes awhile to cool off the concrete. LOL..2500 pesos is a good deal for a large 2 bedroom house...let me know where to find one.
  • 0

#19 Coz2wonder

Coz2wonder

    Guru

  • Members
  • 5,617 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 26 February 2010 - 03:28 PM

you have GOT to be kidding me..."I belong to a hospitality organization and I have guests staying with me quite often"

I hope you are paying your taxes of IVA for your hospitality suites.

From the description you gave, broken shutters, no windows...what do you charge for such luxury?
  • 0

The most important thing in life is not knowing everything, it's having the phone number of somebody who does!

Anonymous


#20 CZMDM

CZMDM

    Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 811 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cozumel Island.

Posted 26 February 2010 - 03:40 PM

Per the a/c: It's very hot here except for a few months with heat the index in the upper 90's for months on end and humidity that is just off the charts. Whenever I go to a visitors condo or rental house or hotel room the a/c is blasting. I really don't think too many North Americans could live here and be comfortable without a/c at least several hours in the evenings. Plus the humidity combined with the constant dust that is always here will play havoc with any type of hi-tech equipment: Stereos, HD-TV's, computers, etc. and of course if you live on the ground level near the beach you are going to have oxidation problems from open windows and salty air. Most of the local Mexicans that I know that own successful high end businesses are the same...the air is blasting in their homes. So to me its like...if you can live in swealtering heat that lasts for months on end, you are good to go. BUT if you live in the States and when the summer comes around and you run the a/c all the time you would be in for one big uncomfortable shock here. It's like anything else. If you want a Mercedes and it's within your budget then it's no big deal. If you want a/c, it's expensive and if you have a pool that is expensive too. If you can afford it...great. If you can't, but still need these things you may want to review your decision to move here.
  • 0

Cozumel Diving





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users