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American Kids and Cozumel Schools


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#21 Coz_Aholic

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 09:10 AM

OK more information needed. I am getting advise about 2 schoold. Gardner and Colegio Cozumel.

I did make a visit to Gardner and I liked what I heard and saw. Here the information I am getting.

Gardner

1. 1/2 day is taught in Spanish and Math is in Spanish. The other 1/2 day is in English.

2. French is taught.

3.School will assist with/proctor tests from the states...they have done so for others.

4. Inscription is lower than Colegio but tuition is higher, works out about equal.

5. School is only 3 blocks away, easy walk.

Colegio

1. Suppossedly most classes are taught in English, except Spanish and Religion.

2. They have religion class...a positive.

3. I need to check about proctoring Statesid exams.

4. It is on the other side of town from me.

5. They have a 24 hr website for homework assist.


Can anyone add or clarify for me?
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#22 GringaErin

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Posted 25 August 2010 - 10:54 AM

When I was looking at schools for my daughter back in March, I also visited Colegio (and the Montessori). I was under the impression that most of the classes at colegio were in Spanish, and English was more of a secondary. Also, the director and teacher that I spoke with didn't have a firm grasp of English. Sure we communicated ok, but it was kind of a struggle on both ends. I kind of felt like if the school is touting itself as "Cambridge accredited" the director of admissions should have been able to communicate more clearly. Not that this should be a deal breaker for you, but how are they going to proctor a test in English from the US? If they haven't done this before for other students, I don't know if I'd want to be the guinea pig. But I don't have any experience, other than my visit, to say "yea or nay" in terms of the quality of education there. I personally just didn't get a good feeling.

Gardner, at least in the primary grades, kind of teach all subjects in both English and Spanish, half day in each. English is taught as a second language, versus an "immersion" situation where it is the only language used for the half day. My daughter is kind of bored at some points during the English portion of the day, as she's fluent :) But I think her confidence in English lets her help out her friends, and they in turn help her out in Spanish. Symbiotic relationship... The school also has a "value of the month", such as, honesty, respect, love, etc., that they use as a theme for activities. Not religion per se, but valuable "loving your neighbor" type things. Also, in terms of homework help, I felt that both of my daughter's teachers were available. My issue is more of a language barrier with my ability to help my daughter with homework, as I'm still learning Spanish, and my daughter's Spanish teacher totally helped me on more than one occasion. All of the teachers' aides were totally helpful too, just by knowing to speak slower to us. :)

Is it possible for your grand daughter to come down and check both of them out for herself? I ultimately let my 5 year old decide which one she liked the most out of the 3 we visited. Unconventional, maybe, but we all have to live with our decisions at some point :)

Good luck!
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#23 Coz_Aholic

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 09:53 AM

Erin

It looks like Gardner is the choice. My only concern now is the Math in Spanish. We are giving her a computer Spanish class and she is also getting lessons from a Spanish friend's family. From what I have heard is that the Enlish speakers help the Spanish kids and vice versa. My son is meeting with the counselor to go over requirements in the states and recommendations. We have a year to prepare so I think we can make this happen fairly smoothly.
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#24 mar

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 05:11 PM

Hello,

I found your post both informative and interesting Traveler. My wife and I intend to re-locate to Cozumel in the near future. You mentioned in your post that there is lack of qualified English teachers, I was inquiring as to my qualifications within the Cozumel school system.I hold a B.A (Social Development Studies, major), BSW ( Bachelor of Social work), and I am considering the TESL program at my local college. Both degrees were attained recently in Canada, where we currently reside. My wife is previously from Mexico and has been in Canada for a period of five years. We have decided to move to the island and recently purchased a small home. I am in my late 40's and I would like to continue receiving an income through employment, even if it were only on a part-time basis. We will be on the island in December 2010. I was wondering if your wife would be able to meet to further discuss any possibilities to teach English in Cozumel.

Thank-you
Paul & Martha
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#25 mar

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 05:21 PM

Hello,

I forgot to add my e-mail address from the previous reply.
charlesbrooks896@sympatico.ca


My wife has been involved in education in Cozumel for 15 years, she is now an english teacher(completed the Cambridge TKT Course, the teacher training course for teachers and trainee teachers preparing for the Cambridge ESOL 'Teaching Knowledge Test' or other initial teacher training qualifications) and is the supervisior of the english as a foreign language program(state mandated) in the federal/public schools her in Cozumel, next year this program will fall under a federal mandate. Our son is 15 and has just finished the 9th grade, in the last 9 years, he attended several private and finished the last 2 years in a public middle school, this year his grade average was 9.4 out 10 and for the last 3 years his(with mother pushing) he finished with a 8.9 average. He has a 100% use of spanish(his 1st language), 85% english, and 90% baseball.

With some authority we can say that there is a shortage of qualified schools, teachers and directors, both spanish and english speaking, here on Cozumel. the only school that we think would meet your needs would be:

"Instituto Gardner"
Location: Calle 17 Bis Sur between Avenidas 40 and 45,
Email: info@institutogardner.com.mx Phone: 987- 869-2176

Most of the other private schools have 1 or 2 good teachers, but over all are lacking....... I would avoid them even if they were free, My son quaified for "scholastic scholarships" for 8 of the last 9 years and last year and 1/2 we went with "public schools" with outside "math tutoring". For high school, we are going with home schooling/escuela abierta, following a SEP(Secretaría de Educación Pública) federal mandated program.

T.


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#26 Carey

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 05:22 PM

Be aware that you will make an absolutely shockingly low salary teaching English in any of the schools here. This is compared to US salaries. You will not half be able to live on it even if you work full-time. I hope you are not counting on income from a part-time teaching position here to cover your living expenses because that dog won't hunt.
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#27 Coz2wonder

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 05:48 PM

My niece is a "Virtual" teacher in the state of Florida. They serves student from around the world.

It has worked very well for the students, and my niece said she enjoys this method of education over the classroom environment.

She also makes a VERY good salary.

You might see what is available as an educator from a program like this.

Perhaps, a parent would find this an excellent alternative, or supplement to their child's education.

http://www.flvs.net/...seOverview.aspx
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#28 GringaErin

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 05:53 PM

Erin

It looks like Gardner is the choice. My only concern now is the Math in Spanish. We are giving her a computer Spanish class and she is also getting lessons from a Spanish friend's family. From what I have heard is that the Enlish speakers help the Spanish kids and vice versa. My son is meeting with the counselor to go over requirements in the states and recommendations. We have a year to prepare so I think we can make this happen fairly smoothly.



If your grand daughter knows all of her numbers in Spanish, backwards and forwards, and muy rapido, she'll be fine, I'm sure of it :) I also just found out that homework help is offered after school every day (for the Primary school, anyway). One hour, every day, 500 pesos per month, and they'll help with any/all subjects. Or I think it was 30 pesos per "class" for the extra hour. Not sure what the Secundaria offers, but might be worth asking about.
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